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Cleveland Rally to Support Strong Mercury Standards

Cleveland Rally to Support Strong Mercury Standards

Sierra Club

President Barack Obama is facing a December deadline to enact the first-ever federal mercury standards. If he follows through, this would be a major environmental victory with long-lasting effects on the health of Ohioans. This is our last chance to support strong mercury standards and push back against the abuses of big polluters. Ohio's coal plants produce more than 4,208 pounds of airborne mercury a year, ranking second in the country for mercury pollution. It's time for clean air.

Event Details:

What: A community discussion at the Cleveland Public Library followed by a honk-a-thon in Willard Park.

When: Dec. 1 at 11 a.m., honk-a-thon to follow at noon.

Where: Cleveland Public Library, 325 Superior Ave., Cleveland (map) & Willard Park, corner of East 9th St. and Lakeside Ave. E (map)

Experts will be on hand to discuss the dangers of mercury and how the new standards will help save lives. Children are particularly impacted by the destructive health effects of mercury, so we are calling on all parents to help push these protections across the finish line. Bring the kids, too.

If big polluters have their way, these protections will be dead in the water. Join us for this final push.

To register for this event, click here.

For more information, click here or contact Rashay Layman at rashay.layman@sierraclub.org or 614-461-0734 x 307.

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