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Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Celebrates America Recycles Day

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo

When can you turn a bag of aluminum cans or some old pots and pans into a free ticket to Cleveland Metroparks Zoo? During America Recycles Day.

That’s right, on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. visitors can celebrate America Recycles Day by bringing in select recyclables in exchange for one free admission with the purchase of a regular admission.

Eligible materials include aluminum cans, cell phones and accessories, newspaper, catalogs, junk mail, magazines, ink jet and toner print cartridges, household plastics with the recycle symbol and the No. 1-7 on them, cooking and dining supplies and utensils, election signs and pairs of shoes (no single shoes, rubber flip flops, ice skates, roller skates, slippers, ski boots or completely ruined or broken footwear will be accepted).

There will also be free document shredding until 3 p.m. (limit three bags or boxes), an area of exhibitors who promote different aspects of “reduce, reuse, recycle” and a rain barrel workshop (separate registration required, call 216- 524-6580, Ext. 22).

Proceeds from the aluminum cans collected will benefit Bat Conservation International.

And don’t forget that compact fluorescent light bulbs, cell phones and accessories, and ink jet and toner cartridges can be dropped off any day at the recycling station in the Zoo’s Exhibit Hall. Newspapers, magazines, junk mail and shredded paper (bagged) can be deposited in the yellow and green Abitibi-Bowater Paper Retriever bins in the rear of the Hippo Parking Lot behind The RainForest.

 

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