Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Clean Air under Attack in Arctic

Clean Air under Attack in Arctic

Oceana

Susan Murray, Oceana’s Pacific senior director, issued the following statement as Oceana joined a petition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 for the recall of air permits for Shell’s Discoverer drillship. The Discoverer drillship, along with the Kulluk drillship that received a permit Oct. 21, are scheduled to head to the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for ocean offshore oil drilling in the summer of 2012. The permit would allow Shell’s fleet to emit significant amounts of air pollutants that are harmful to human health and the environment:

“Oceana is disheartened at the EPA’s blatant disregard of their mission to protect human health and the environment. Oceana along with other groups request the Environmental Appeals Board revoke and review the air permits.

“The decisions the EPA are making open the floodgates for increased air pollution in the Arctic. Allowing relaxed emission levels for drilling operations is a horrible precedent that will ultimately pollute the crisp Arctic airshed.

“The Clean Air Act was designed not only to clean up dirty air, but also to prevent clean air from becoming polluted. This bad permit simply does not require Shell to comply with limits designed to keep air clean.

“America needs to do what is best for the Arctic ecosystem and not what is best for an oil company’s bottom line. The vibrancy and biodiversity of Arctic communities and ecosystems depend on how we manage development. Oceana will continue to work towards ensuring that development will not harm ecosystem health, including subsistence.”

For more information, click here.

Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Climate change can evoke intense feelings, but a conversational approach can help. Reed Kaestner / Getty Images

Anger, anxiety, overwhelm … climate change can evoke intense feelings.


Read More Show Less
A rare North Atlantic right whale is seen off Cape Cod Bay on April 14, 2019 near Provincetown, Massachusetts. Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

An extremely rare North Atlantic right whale calf was found dead off the North Carolina coast on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Sprinklers irrigate a field of onions near a Castilian village in Spain. According to a new study, the average farm size in the EU has almost doubled since the 1960s. miguelangelortega / Moment / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A new report released Tuesday details the "shocking" state of global land equality, saying the problem is worse than thought, rising, and "cannot be ignored."

Read More Show Less