Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

City Passes Resolution to Strengthen Clean Air Act

City Passes Resolution to Strengthen Clean Air Act

Center for Biological Diversity

The Berkeley City Council unanimously passed a resolution in support of strengthening the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) use of the Clean Air Act to reduce carbon and other pollutants. This action was taken in the interest of public health and averting the worst effects of climate change. By passing the resolution, Berkeley becomes the latest city to join the Center for Biological Diversity’s national Clean Air Cities campaign.

“Local governments must act to protect their citizens and the health of their communities, especially now, as well-funded corporate lobbyists press Congress to weaken the EPA and its regulations,” said Berkeley Vice-Mayor and Council Member Linda Maio, who sponsored the resolution.

“Efforts by cities are even more important as the U.S. House tries to prevent long-overdue efforts to reduce mercury and other toxic metals, as well as smog and soot, from industrial boilers, solid waste incinerators and cement plants,” said Rose Braz, the center’s climate campaign director. “Cities give voice to our communities that favor using the best tool we have for curbing pollution and limiting global warming—the Clean Air Act.”

The center’s new Clean Air Cities campaign is working with volunteers around the country to encourage cities to pass resolutions supporting the Clean Air Act and using it to reduce carbon in the atmosphere to no more than 350 parts per million, the level scientists say is needed to avoid catastrophic climate change.

“The planet is telling us that we cannot afford to delay comprehensive reductions in CO2. The evidence is clear that we must begin to make those reductions now. Further delays are irresponsible and dangerous to all life on the planet," said Tom Kelly of KyotoUSA, which partnered with the center on the effort. “The resolution passed by the Berkeley City Council demonstrates to the federal government that citizens strongly support the use of the Clean Air Act to begin making those reductions.”

For more information, click here.

—————

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 320,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

air
An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less