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Citing 'High Risk of Rupture,' Groups Call for Rejection of Enbridge Pipeline

Energy

Environmental Defence

Evidence submitted last week to the National Energy Board (NEB) regarding Enbridge’s application to reverse its Line 9 oil pipeline through Quebec and Ontario raised new concerns about the safety of the project and the high risk of an oil spill.

 

International pipeline safety expert, Richard Kuprewicz, who has more than 40 years of energy industry experience, has held management positions at pipeline companies and has assisted various parties in major investigations into pipeline ruptures, concluded that:

  • There is a high risk that Line 9 will rupture in the early years following project implementation due a combination of cracking and corrosion.
  • Enbridge’s approach to pipeline safety management for this pipeline will not prevent rupture under the operating conditions resulting from the implementation of the project.
  • Should a rupture occur, Enbridge’s leak detection system and emergency response plans are inadequate. It would take up to four hours for emergency response in the Greater Toronto and Montreal areas. The response times are inadequate for the many high consequence areas (defined as highly populated areas, other populated areas, drinking water resources, environmentally sensitive areas and commercially navigable waterways) located along Line 9.

The evidence was filed as part of the NEB intervention by Equiterre, Environmental Defence, ENvironnement JEUnesse (ENJEU), The Association Québécoise de Lute Dontre la Pollution Atmosphérique (AQLPA), The Sierra Club Canada (Quebec Chapter), Climate Justice Montreal (CJM) and Nature Québec. This coalition of environmental groups is urging the NEB to reject Enbridge’s Line 9 reversal proposal.

“This evidence clearly shows what we have been saying for a long time. This project will put the health and the quality of the environment of our communities at risk both in Ontario and Quebec. In light of this, I cannot see how the NEB could approve this reckless project,” said Steven Guilbeault, senior director with Equiterre.

“This is the most damning indictment we’ve seen of Enbridge’s plan, which would saddle Ontario and Quebec with the danger of a tar sands oil spill,” said Adam Scott of Environmental Defence. “The Line 9 proposal should be rejected. Our communities, our drinking water and our shared environment shouldn’t be put at risk.”

In light of Kuprewicz’s findings of a high risk for rupture of Line 9, energy economics experts, Ian Goodman and Brigid Rowan, who recently co-authored an influential study of Keystone XL job impacts, concluded:

  • The implementation of this project would involve a substantial risk of major economic damage and disruption – and potential loss of life. This is especially true in Toronto and Montreal, where the pipeline runs parallel to or crosses key urban infrastructure and could threaten the drinking water supply.
  • Due to Line 9B’s extraordinary proximity to people, water and economic activity, the rupture costs of the project vary from significant to catastrophic. Given the high risk of rupture, the expected project cost also varies from significant to catastrophic.
  • Based on an evaluation of economic costs and benefits, the potential economic costs could exceed the potential economic benefits.

Visit EcoWatch’s PIPELINES page for more related news on this topic.

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