Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Citing 'High Risk of Rupture,' Groups Call for Rejection of Enbridge Pipeline

Energy
Citing 'High Risk of Rupture,' Groups Call for Rejection of Enbridge Pipeline

Environmental Defence

Evidence submitted last week to the National Energy Board (NEB) regarding Enbridge’s application to reverse its Line 9 oil pipeline through Quebec and Ontario raised new concerns about the safety of the project and the high risk of an oil spill.

 

International pipeline safety expert, Richard Kuprewicz, who has more than 40 years of energy industry experience, has held management positions at pipeline companies and has assisted various parties in major investigations into pipeline ruptures, concluded that:

  • There is a high risk that Line 9 will rupture in the early years following project implementation due a combination of cracking and corrosion.
  • Enbridge’s approach to pipeline safety management for this pipeline will not prevent rupture under the operating conditions resulting from the implementation of the project.
  • Should a rupture occur, Enbridge’s leak detection system and emergency response plans are inadequate. It would take up to four hours for emergency response in the Greater Toronto and Montreal areas. The response times are inadequate for the many high consequence areas (defined as highly populated areas, other populated areas, drinking water resources, environmentally sensitive areas and commercially navigable waterways) located along Line 9.

The evidence was filed as part of the NEB intervention by Equiterre, Environmental Defence, ENvironnement JEUnesse (ENJEU), The Association Québécoise de Lute Dontre la Pollution Atmosphérique (AQLPA), The Sierra Club Canada (Quebec Chapter), Climate Justice Montreal (CJM) and Nature Québec. This coalition of environmental groups is urging the NEB to reject Enbridge’s Line 9 reversal proposal.

“This evidence clearly shows what we have been saying for a long time. This project will put the health and the quality of the environment of our communities at risk both in Ontario and Quebec. In light of this, I cannot see how the NEB could approve this reckless project,” said Steven Guilbeault, senior director with Equiterre.

“This is the most damning indictment we’ve seen of Enbridge’s plan, which would saddle Ontario and Quebec with the danger of a tar sands oil spill,” said Adam Scott of Environmental Defence. “The Line 9 proposal should be rejected. Our communities, our drinking water and our shared environment shouldn’t be put at risk.”

In light of Kuprewicz’s findings of a high risk for rupture of Line 9, energy economics experts, Ian Goodman and Brigid Rowan, who recently co-authored an influential study of Keystone XL job impacts, concluded:

  • The implementation of this project would involve a substantial risk of major economic damage and disruption – and potential loss of life. This is especially true in Toronto and Montreal, where the pipeline runs parallel to or crosses key urban infrastructure and could threaten the drinking water supply.
  • Due to Line 9B’s extraordinary proximity to people, water and economic activity, the rupture costs of the project vary from significant to catastrophic. Given the high risk of rupture, the expected project cost also varies from significant to catastrophic.
  • Based on an evaluation of economic costs and benefits, the potential economic costs could exceed the potential economic benefits.

Visit EcoWatch’s PIPELINES page for more related news on this topic.

——–

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch