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Chris Pratt Poses With Plastic Water Bottle, Gets Called out by Jason Momoa

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Chris Pratt arrives to the Los Angeles premiere of "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom" on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. Michael Tran / FilmMagic / Getty Images

Chris Pratt was called out on social media by Game of Thrones star Jason Momoa after Pratt posted an image "low key flexing" with a single-use plastic water bottle.


"Bro I love u but wtf on the water bottle," Momoa commented on Pratt's Instagram account. "No single use plastic. Come on."

USA Today notes that Momoa has taken a lead in sustainability and global plastic reduction. The star has spent the last year advocating and working with the United Nations to protect marine ecosystems and eliminate single-use plastic products, reports the Washington Post.

It comes after estimates project that by 2050, the ocean is expected to contain more plastic than fish by weight, according to a report from the BBC. A whopping 40 percent of the plastic produced is used just once, according to a National Geographic article.

Pratt responded to Momoa's call-out.

"Aquaman! You're completely right. Da**it," Pratt wrote in response. "I always carry my big gallon size reusable water jug with me too. I even had it that day!!! If I remember correctly somebody threw that plastic bottle to me in the photo shoot cause I didn't know what to do with my hands."

Pratt added that he normally brings along a reusable gallon jug to the gym and even had it with him on the day of the photograph.

"My bad. I don't want your home of Atlantis covered in plastic. Hear that kids? Reduce. Reuse. Recycle," he wrote to the Aquaman star.

Momoa later popped back onto social media to post a public apology to Pratt. "I'm sorry this was received so badly today I didn't mean for that to happen," he wrote. "I'm just very passionate about this single use plastic epidemic."

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