Quantcast

Chloe & Theo: A Movie That Will Change the Way You Look at the World

Climate

[Take the Chloe & Theo: #LessIsMore Climate Pledge by clicking here.]

Have you ever wanted to meet someone that changes the way you look at the world? Now is your chance. "Chloe & Theo" featuring "50 Shades of Grey" star Dakota Johnson, Mira Sorvino and Theo Ikummaq hits select theaters Sept. 4 and will be available on video on demand.

"Chloe & Theo" tells the story of Theo, an Inuit from the Arctic, who travels from “the top of the Earth” to New York City with an important message for world leaders about the catastrophic impact climate change is having on his home. Upon arrival, he meets a fiery and fearless homeless girl Chloe and together they embark on an odyssey to save the world.

This film was championed by first-time producer Monica Ord. Neither a climate scientist nor a filmmaker, Ord has spent nearly two decades in the life sciences industry. She heard Ikummaq's true life tale from a friend, producer Lloyd Phillips, who challenged her to do something about it.

She was so deeply moved by what he told her, that within months, after enlisting the help of Sir Richard Branson, Ord found herself with Inuit elders on a dog-sled expedition in the Arctic to bear witness firsthand to the profound changes that climate change was having on Ikummaq's homeland. It was there on the ice that the idea for this feature film was born.

Sir Richard Branson in the Arctic visiting Theo Ikummaq home.

After returning home to California, Ord quickly enlisted the help of an army of visionaries—including James Cameron, Sir Branson, John Paul DeJoria, scriptwriter and director Ezna Sands and actors Dakota Johnson and Mira Sorvino—with just one hope in mind ... to get Ikummaq's message out in an entertaining feature that would move people to action.

Now, many years later, the dramatic film "Chloe & Theo" is complete.

Read page 1

“What’s happening in the Arctic, to Theo’s people, and many indigenous groups on this planet is real,” said Ord. “Nothing is going to change until we care enough to feel their suffering as if it's our own. If this little film can help move the needle to reach people's hearts and minds, I will be eternally grateful."

This very powerful, heartwarming and entertaining story will inspire audiences everywhere. "Chloe & Theo" not only raises awareness on the impacts of climate change, but underlines the need to care for one another and diminish the power consumerism has on our lives.

“This film has a strong environmental theme, but it has a much stronger humanitarian message,” said writer and director Ezna Sands. “It’s about how we regard one another. Recognizing that we’re all connected.”

“Climate change is affecting the most remote communities,” said Sir Branson, who traveled to Ikummaq’s home Igloolik with Ord to witness the changes prior to the movies conception. “Witnessing the impact of global warming on the Arctic and the Inuit people confirmed in my heart that each of us is deeply connected to people in remote corners of the world.”

DeJoria agrees. "Chloe & Theo exposes where the world is today and why each of us need to make changes … for our generation … but most importantly for the next."

The film will be shown in the following cities starting Friday, Sept. 4: New York, NY at Cinema Village; Beverly Hills, CA at Laemmle Music Hall; Woodridge, IL at AMC Woodridge; Bensalem, PA at AMC Neshaminy; Framingham, MA at AMC Framingham; Alpharetta, GA at AMC Mansell Crossing; Detroit, MI at Cinema Detroit; Lynnwood, WA at AMC Alderwood; Maple Grove, MN at AMC Arbor Lakes; and Ocoee, FL at AMC West Oaks.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

CHLOE & THEO: #LessIsMore Climate Pledge

We Have Already Consumed a Year’s Supply of the Planet’s Resources in Less Than 8 Months

Deadly Heat Waves Sweep the Globe

21 Youths File Landmark Climate Lawsuit Against Federal Government

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pick one of these nine activism styles, and you can start making change. YES! Illustrations by Delphine Lee

By Cathy Brown

Most of us have heard about UN researchers warning that we need to make dramatic changes in the next 12 years to limit our risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty caused by climate change. Report after report about a bleak climate future can leave people in despair.

Read More Show Less
Jamie Grill Photography / Getty Images

Losing weight, improving heart health and decreasing your chances for metabolic diseases like diabetes may be as simple as cutting back on a handful of Oreos or saying no to a side of fries, according to a new study published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
A boy gives an impromptu speech about him not wanting to die in the next 10 years during the protest on July 15. The Scottish wing of the Extinction Rebellion environmental group of Scotland locked down Glasgow's Trongate for 12 hours in protest of climate change. Stewart Kirby / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

It's important to remember that one person can make a difference. From teenagers to world-renowned scientists, individuals are inspiring positive shifts around the world. Maybe you won't become a hard-core activist, but this list of people below can inspire simple ways to kickstart better habits. Here are seven people advocating for a better planet.

Read More Show Less
A group of wind turbines in a field in Banffshire, Northeast Scotland. Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Scotland produced enough power from wind turbines in the first half of 2019, that it could power Scotland twice over. Put another way, it's enough energy to power all of Scotland and most of Northern England, according to the BBC — an impressive step for the United Kingdom, which pledged to be carbon neutral in 30 years.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Beekeeper Jeff Anderson works with members of his family in this photo from 2014. He once employed all of his adult children but can no longer afford to do so. CHRIS JORDAN-BLOCH / EARTHJUSTICE

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

It's been a particularly terrible summer for bees. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it is allowing the bee-killing pesticide sulfoxaflor back on the market. And just a few weeks prior, the USDA announced it is suspending data collection for its annual honeybee survey, which tracks honeybee populations across the U.S., providing critical information to farmers and scientists.

Read More Show Less

tommaso79 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Rachel Licker

As a new mom, I've had to think about heat safety in many new ways since pregnant women and young children are among the most vulnerable to extreme heat.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to get confused about which foods are healthy and which aren't.

Read More Show Less