Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Chinese Auto Show Displays a Trend Towards Electric Vehicles

Business
Chinese Auto Show Displays a Trend Towards Electric Vehicles
Pixabay

Auto China 2018, the largest global auto show in the world, opens this week and reflected China's status as the world's largest market for electric vehicles (EVs), The Associated Press reported Sunday.

China has worked hard to increase its role in the EV market in an attempt both to battle air pollution and to compete in emerging technological fields from robotics to renewable energy.


"Just in the last two or three years, China rose from being a very small player in the global EV market to be nearly 50 percent of sales in 2017," Christopher Robinson of Lux Research told The Associated Press.

China's government originally supported that sales jump through subsidies to carmakers and buyers, but, as of 2019, automakers will have to earn credits either by selling EVs or buying them from competitors, and stricter fuel efficiency standards will further encourage automakers to sell EVs in China.

Automakers predict that 35 to 50 percent of their China car sales will be electric by 2025.

Models on display at the 2018 show that reflect this trend will include five EVs from Detroit-based General Motors (GM), among them a Buick SUV that can go 600 kilometers (approximately 375 miles) before needing to recharge.

GM plans to launch 10 EVs and hybrids in China by 2020.

Ford Motor Co. also plans to design 15 EVs for the Chinese market by 2025 and released its first Chinese plug-in hybrid, the Mondeo Energi, last month.

Auto China 2018 comes weeks after Scott Pruitt announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found that Obama-era fuel efficiency standards through 2025 should be less strict. Lowering standards was something the big three Detroit automakers pushed for, but the China show demonstrates that automakers can step up to the plate and design for greater fuel efficiency and environmental health.

China has been the world's largest car market since 2009. Last year, 24.7 million sedans, SUVs and minivans were sold in China compared with 17.2 million in the U.S.

China also beats the U.S. as the No. 1 market for EVs.

But while EV sales are growing in China, most car companies still don't turn a profit making them. Instead, they make their cash by selling SUVs, which Chinese drivers see as safe.

Other brands displaying EV models at the show will include Nissan, VW, and China's own BYD Auto, which makes the most EVs worldwide.

The show will take place in Beijing from April 25 to May 4, according to its website.

The Trump administration has weakened fuel-efficiency requirements for the nation's cars and trucks. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

As the days tick down to next month's presidential election, debate rages over the U.S. government's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic with critics of President Donald Trump calling for his ouster due to his failure to protect the American public.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Researchers have discovered a link between air pollution, food delivery and plastic waste. Sorapop / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have discovered a link between air pollution, food delivery and plastic waste.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Plain Naturals offers a wide variety of CBD products including oils, creams and gummies.

Plain Naturals is making waves in the CBD space with a new product line for retail customers looking for high potency CBD products at industry-low prices.

Read More Show Less
One report in spring 2020 found that 38% of students at four-year universities were food-insecure. Frederic J. Brown / AFP / Getty Images

By Matthew J. Landry and Heather Eicher-Miller

When university presidents were surveyed in spring of 2020 about what they felt were the most pressing concerns of COVID-19, college students going hungry didn't rank very high.

Read More Show Less
Coast Guard members work to clean an oil spill impacting Delaware beaches. U.S. Coast Guard District 5

Environmental officials and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are racing to clean up a mysterious oil spill that has spread to 11 miles of Delaware coastline.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch