Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Chefs Guy Fieri and José Andrés Feed Thousands of California Wildfire Victims

Food
"Our @WCKitchen Relief Team is on the ground in Redding, California to serve the #CarrFire evacuee shelters & emergency crews! Coordinating with @Cal_OES @RedCross @SalvationArmyUS to deliver hot meals with our Food First Responder partners @GuyFieri @OpBBQRelief!" @chefjoseandres / Twitter

Celebrity chefs Guy Fieri, José Andrés and food relief organizations are serving thousands of meals to first responders and evacuees of California's raging wildfires.

There are 15 serious wildfires burning across California as of Tuesday, with 12,300 firefighters battling the infernos. The flames have scorched more than 280,000 acres across the state, forcing more than 44,000 residents to evacuate.


Northern California's Carr Fire, the largest of the wildfires, started on July 23 and tore through the city of Redding. It destroyed more than 1,200 buildings, killed six people and displaced tens of thousands.

Fieri—a Santa Rosa resident who also served barbecue to victims and first responders of last year's wine country fires—headed to Redding on Saturday. Two days later, members of Andrés' nonprofit World Central Kitchen joined the "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives" host and fellow food first responders Operation BBQ Relief to provide meals for those in shelters and to first responders, according to CNN.

"My team and I got involved. My son and his buddies, and a bunch of my buddies, loaded up the caravan from wine country and drove four hours up here," Fieri told CNN. "We are just working arm-in-arm with the Salvation Army, local chefs, residents and everybody helping out all of the evacuees."

The team was able to make more than 1,000 meals twice a day for those affected by the wildfires, Nate Mook, executive director for World Central Kitchen told CNN.

Fieri added, "It's unbelievable to see what folks are going through, but it's even more unbelievable just how great this community is, and [to see] all these folks that have come together."

World Central Kitchen, founded by Michelin-starred chef Andrés in 2010 to provide meals in the wake of natural disasters, also served food to those in need during last year's devastating Thomas Fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, the largest wildfire in the state's modern history.

The nonprofit is coordinating with California's Office of Emergency Services, the Red Cross, and the Salvation Army to oversee food relief. With partners Operation BBQ Relief and Fieri, they established a central kitchen in California that is prepared to provide 5,000 meals across five evacuation centers every day.

Andrés is not currently in the state but is monitoring the situation and will fly in if needed, Mook told CNN.

"We got six chefs in Redding. Depending on the need we will bring more chefs and volunteers. We don't know what the next four days will look like, so he will be paying close attention," he said.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

By Dave Cooke

So, they finally went and did it — the Trump administration just finalized a rule to undo requirements on manufacturers to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new passenger cars and trucks. Even with the economy at the brink of a recession, they went forward with a policy they know is bad for consumers — their own analysis shows that American drivers are going to spend hundreds of dollars more in fuel as a result of this stupid policy — but they went ahead and did it anyway.

Read More Show Less

By Richard Connor

A blood test that screens for more than 50 types of cancer could help doctors treat patients at an earlier stage than previously possible, a new study shows. The method was used to screen for more than 50 types of cancer — including particularly deadly variants such as pancreatic, ovarian, bowel and brain.

Read More Show Less
Ian Sane / Flickr

Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control showed a larger number of young people coming down with COVID-19 than first expected, with patients under the age of 45 comprising more than a third of all cases, and one in five of those patients requiring hospitalization. That also tends to be the group most likely to use e-cigarettes.

Read More Show Less