Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Celebrities Rally to Stop Fracking

Energy

Stop the Frack Attack

Today, celebrities and environmental leaders joined the call for the first-ever national mobilization on fracking on July 28 in Washington, D.C., called “Stop the Frack Attack.” The event will have three demands for Congress: stop dangerous fracking, close seven legal loopholes that exempt the oil and gas industry from parts of the Safe Drinking Water, Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and implement a pathway towards 100 percent clean renewable energy.

Mark Ruffalo, Pete Seeger, Lois Gibbs, Bill McKibben, Ed Begley Jr., Ed Asner, Josh Fox, Gus Speth, Cornel West, Vandana Shiva, Holly Near, James Hansen, Dar Williams, Michael Kieschnick, Joe Uehlein and Margot Kidder join more than 100 organizations and community groups in their call to action.

"Fracking is proof our addiction to fossil fuels has gone too far,” said Margot Kidder. “In the face of this kind of destruction, doing nothing is not an option. I'll be in D.C. on July 28 because I’m worried about the world my grandchildren will inherit without immediate action. We have to stop the destruction, and we have to do it now."

Fracking is a hot-button issue in swing states including PA, OH, CO, NM, NC, and MT. In New York, high-volume fracking in shale is on hold while the state reviews its impacts, and the fight against the practice includes calls for a total ban. However, Governor Cuomo is threatening to authorize the practice, possibly starting in selected parts of the state, despite the concerns of communities that would be impacted.

“Fracking is a big new part of the biggest thing humans have ever done: destroy our climate,” said Bill McKibben, co-founder and board president of 350.org.

Congress has exempted the oil and gas industry from seven laws that usually serve to protect communities surrounding fossil fuel extraction sites. Those laws include the Clean Air Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, and have left communities fighting fracking with little to no protection from contamination despite widespread evidence of dangers.

“When an entire industry is exempt from the Safe Drinking Water Act, you know common sense has been thrown out the window,” concludes Jennifer Krill from Earthworks. “This situation is out of control, and we are coming to Washington to demand Congress close these loopholes, stop unsafe fracking and put us on a path to 100 percent clean, renewable energy.”

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

———

Stop the Frack Attack will be a national mobilization on the West Lawn of the Capitol on July 28, 2012. The mobilization has been endorsed by more than 100 community-based and national organizations and has an advisory board of fracking-impacted community representatives from eight states.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Traffic moves across the Brooklyn Bridge on Aug. 2, 2018 in New York City. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

The Trump administration is expected to unveil its final replacement of Obama-era fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks Tuesday in a move likely to pump nearly a billion more tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere over the lifetime of those less-efficient vehicles.

Read More Show Less
U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less
A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less