Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Celebrities Ask 'What the Frack?'

Fracking

Today, celebrities and environmental advocates—including Malin Akerman, Lance Bass, Julie Bowen, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Darren Criss, Daryl Hannah, Hayden Panettiere, Amy Smart, Marisa Tomei, Wilmer Valderrama, Constance Zimmer and others—are featured in a series of new videos, which aim to educate Americans about the dangers that fracking poses to the nation, and to put pressure on government officials to move to a renewable energy economy instead.

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is a highly controversial process for extracting oil and gas that, along with related drilling, wastewater disposal and other extreme extraction methods like acidizing, has raised serious environmental and public health concerns across the country.

Below, celebrities ask Gov. Brown (D-CA): What the frack?

Produced by Appeal to Reason for Americans Against Fracking, the Environmental Media Association, Food & Water Watch and Environment America, these celebrity videos are part of a series calling out leading Democratic governors in Colorado, California and New York, as well as President Obama, by highlighting some of the facts that make fracking inherently unsafe. 

“With recent measures to curb fracking approved by voters in Ohio and Colorado earlier this month, the public continues to reject fracking, and we’re proud to stand with some of our favorite actors to take a stand against this toxic, senseless practice,” said Food & Water Watch Executive Director Wenonah Hauter.

“To date, nearly 400 communities in the United States have taken action against fracking, and that number will only grow as more and more people realize we need to curb global warming by lighting our futures with clean, truly renewable energy resources,” Hauter concluded. 

“Fracking is a dirty form of oil drilling that pollutes our air and our oceans,” added Golden Globe-nominated actress and environmentalist Hayden Panettiere. “It’s time to move to clean renewable energy. We need to stop fracking now!”

Below, celebrities ask Gov. Hickenlooper (D-CO): What the frack?

Across the country, the more Americans know about fracking—the facts, science and harsh water and public health impacts—the more they oppose it. This fact is clear in recent polls, such as a current Pew Research Group poll that found opposition to fracking has grown significantly across most regions and  demographic groups over the past six months. 

Nationally, 49 percent oppose increased fracking, while 44 percent support it. In California, a recent poll showed 53-32 percent oppose fracking. In New York, the latest poll showed voters oppose fracking 43-38 percent. In Pennsylvania, about two-thirds of residents support a moratorium due to serious health concerns.

Earlier this year, President Obama articulated the importance of addressing global climate change in his Climate Action Plan. But he mistakenly failed to acknowledge the true climate impacts of drilling and fracking for oil and gas, which will only make the problem worse. Methane, the primary constituent of fracked gas, is a particularly potent greenhouse gas. According to the latest measurements from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), methane is 34 times more damaging to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide over a 100 year time-frame, and 86 times more damaging over a 20 year time-frame. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration has found that the rate of methane leakage in at least two active gas fields is much higher than the U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory’s current estimate, indicating how disastrous fracking can be for the climate.

Below, celebrities ask Gov. Cuomo (D-NY): What the frack?

Additionally, when burned, fracked gas produces significant amounts of carbon dioxide. In fact, even if methane leaks could be minimized to about one percent of what is produced, the International Energy Agency has estimated that a scenario of increased global dependence on fracked gas would lead to an increase in the global average temperature by 3.5 degrees Celsius, or by about 6.3 degrees Fahrenheit, by 2035.

In response to the science and increasing harms of fracking, public action in opposition to fracking is increasing. In August, a million Americans signed petitions objecting to the Obama Administration’s plans to frack on federal lands. Nearly 650,000 of those petitions—collected by Americans Against Fracking member organizations—called for a complete ban.

Weeks later, Food & Water Watch, MoveOn.org, Environmental Action, and other organizations in Americans Against Fracking and the Stop the Frack Attack network delivered more than 250,000 petitions asking the Obama Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency to reopen investigations into the potential link between fracking and water contamination in Pennsylvania, Texas and Wyoming.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable meeting with energy sector CEOs in the Cabinet Room of the White House April 3 in Washington, DC. Doug Mills-Pool / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A coalition of climate organizations strongly criticized President Donald Trump's in-person Friday meeting with the chief executives of some of the biggest fossil fuel companies in the world, saying the industry that fueled climate disaster must not be allowed to profiteer from government giveaways by getting bailout funds or preferred treatment during the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD

An Important Note

No supplement, diet, or lifestyle modification — aside from social distancing and practicing proper hygiene ⁠— can protect you from developing COVID-19.

The strategies outlined below may boost your immune health, but they don't protect specifically against COVID-19.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Zak Smith

It is pretty amazing that in this moment when the COVID-19 outbreak has much of the country holed up in their homes binging Netflix, the most watched show in America over the last few weeks has been focused on wildlife trade — which scientists believe is the source of the COVID-19 pandemic. Make no mistake: Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness is about wildlife trade and other aspects of wildlife exploitation, just as surely as the appearance of Ebola, SARS, MERS, avian flu and probably COVID-19 in humans is a result of wildlife exploitation. As a conservationist, this is one of the things I've been thinking about while watching Tiger King. Here are five more:

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Hector Chapa

With the coronavirus pandemic quickly spreading, U.S. health officials have changed their advice on face masks and now recommend people wear cloth masks in public areas where social distancing can be difficult, such as grocery stores.

But can these masks be effective?

Read More Show Less
Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

Bayer AG is reneging on negotiated settlements with several U.S. law firms representing thousands of plaintiffs who claim exposure to Monsanto's Roundup herbicides caused them to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sources involved in the litigation said on Friday.

Read More Show Less