Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Celebrities and Public Join 'Mountain Heroes' Campaign to Stop Mountaintop Removal Mining

Energy
Celebrities and Public Join 'Mountain Heroes' Campaign to Stop Mountaintop Removal Mining

Earthjustice

Today Earthjustice launches its new Mountain Heroes website and biggest-ever public campaign to stop mountaintop removal coal mining. The Mountain Heroes campaign features stories from the Appalachian frontlines of the movement to stop our nation’s most extreme mining practice, as well as personal messages from celebrities including Oscar-nominated actors Edward Norton and Woody Harrelson, four-time Emmy nominated Mad Men star John Slattery, decorated author and poet Wendell Berry, race car driver Leilani Munter, ocean explorer and conservationist Alexandra Cousteau, and more.

Earthjustice’s new Mountain Heroes website is a dynamic, interactive showcase and celebration of the courageous people at the frontlines of this movement and a strong display of solidarity from hundreds of members of the public who have already added their own personal stories and images in the form of an historic public photo petition opposing mountaintop removal. Earthjustice, along with its Mountain Heroes and partners, has a goal of generating thousands of new online photo petitions and will deliver the petitions to the Obama administration on September 13, 2012.

The campaign shares the stories of local champions such as Larry Gibson, Goldman Prize and Wallenberg Medal recipient Maria Gunnoe, longtime community activists and experts Cindy Rank and Chuck Nelson, Youth Brower Award winner Junior Walk, Christians for the Mountains founder Allen Johnson, and numerous other extraordinary Appalachian citizens who have dared to take a stand against one of the worst environmental disasters of our time: mountaintop removal coal mining.

“Throughout Earthjustice’s years of litigation and advocacy to end mountaintop removal mining, we have been inspired and humbled by the dedication and bravery of the people of Appalachia who are leading this movement to save America’s oldest and most biodiverse mountains, protect clean water and save their communities,” said Earthjustice President Trip Van Noppen. “For more than a decade, we’ve been privileged to work alongside our heroes, so we’re proud to share their stories and honor their work to protect communities through our new Mountain Heroes campaign,” added Van Noppen.“Mountaintop removal mining remains one of the nation’s most enduring environmental disasters and human rights violations,” continued Van Noppen. “But we are heartened by the courage and dedication of the leaders of this movement, whose stories and images we feature in our new website and campaign.”

“We appreciate the efforts of all of the friends of Mountain Heroes and members of the public who have already joined this campaign,” said Joan Mulhern, senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice. “We hope the courage and leadership of these Mountain Heroes inspires Americans from coast to coast to join this movement to save our mountains, waters and communities. And we hope it compels our nation’s leaders to end this disastrous mining practice.”

Visit EcoWatch's MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL page for more related news on this topic.

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less