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Celebrate World Water Day March 22

Drink Local. Drink Tap.

Drink Local. Drink Tap. is on a mission to creatively reconnect people with local water in Northeast Ohio and beyond. This year’s World Water Day, themed “Cleveland Water ROCKS!,” is March 22 and will be celebrated for the third year in a row with hundreds of local students, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and volunteers.

Students will participate by walking from City Hall with Jackson to the Rock Hall carrying a day’s worth of water with them in large containers they have decorated. The walk symbolizes the students’ counterparts in Uganda who have to walk miles each day to collect water to survive. After the walk, Drink Local. Drink Tap. (DLDT) will conduct interactive learning sessions and show a water film in the Rock Hall’s theater.

In addition to celebrating World Water Day, DLDT conducts educational outreach through its Wavemaker Program. The Wavemaker Program provides teachers and students with the tools they need to be Wavemakers in the world. Becoming a Wavemaker means: kicking the bottled water habit, volunteering at a beach cleanup, having DLDT speak at an event, in a classroom, or assembly, and raising funds to share water access with fellow students in need. The program allows students to act individually, locally and globally to become water stewards and share with others in need.

Beyond the classroom, DLDT has completed one movie and is working on a documentary for 2012. Living in the Great Lakes Region, Northeast Ohioans are some of the richest people on the planet. Twenty percent of the world’s fresh surface water sits in our backyard and we rarely think twice about turning on the tap, flushing a toilet or taking a shower. We want people to wake up to our water riches and share this positive piece of Cleveland with the world.

On Feb. 25 DLDT is hosting a fundraiser featuring African drumming, food, drink, screening of the DLDT movie and opportunities to purchase photography.

For more information or details about the event, click here.

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