Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

CDP Study Grades 172 Companies on Climate Risks and Actions

Climate
CDP Study Grades 172 Companies on Climate Risks and Actions

While politicians continue debating facts previously proved by several scientists, it's refreshing to know that companies in some of the nation's largest states not only take climate change seriously, but have created low-carbon products and solutions to minimize the emissions of their facilities and product end-users.

CDP, a nonprofit organization that consults businesses on managing, measuring and disclosing environmental data, polled 172 S&P 500-listed companies in nine states, gauging their approach to climate change and grading their actions that might have contributed to the mitigation and adaption to climate change in the past year, as well as their transparency.

State by state: The business response to climate change across America includes an array of facts, figures and a grading chart of the participating companies. Here are some selections from the 60-page report.

[slideshow_deploy id='346880']

In states like Pennsylvania and Texas, more than 90 percent of responding companies had either already identified business opportunities related to climate change or agreed that climate regulation could represented a business opportunity.

From cloud computing solutions to making lighter car tires or implementing energy efficiency measures, most of the responding companies have shown that reducing their carbon footprint need not equate to losses in revenue. For example, Intel Corp. reported that efficient lighting, boiler, heating, air conditioning, ventilation and water system improvements will lead to an annual saving of $22 million after the initial $59 million investment.

"Managing global warming impacts delivers competitive advantage to U.S. companies," said Tom Carnac, president of CDP in North America. "We are moving from a world that's projecting future climate risks to one that's experiencing those risks now. Regulation can help level the playing field, allowing more companies to benefit from mitigating the risks, while speeding up the shift to a profitable low carbon economy."

The Metronome, a famous art installation in Union Square that used to display the time of day, has been repurposed into a "Climate Clock" for Climate Week NYC. Zack Winestine

By Jessica Corbett

This story was originally published on Common Dreams on September 19, 2020.

Some advocates kicked off next week's Climate Week NYC early Saturday by repurposing the Metronome, a famous art installation in Union Square that used to display the time of day, as a massive "Climate Clock" in an effort to pressure governments worldwide to take swift, bold action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and rein in human-caused global heating.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks onstage at the event Fourth Annual Berggruen Prize Gala Celebrates 2019 Laureate Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in New York City on Dec. 16, 2019. Ilya S. Savenok / Getty Images for Berggruen Institute

The passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg means the nation's highest court has lost a staunch advocate for women's rights and civil rights. Ginsburg was a tireless worker, who continued to serve on the bench through multiple bouts of cancer. She also leaves behind a complicated environmental legacy, as Environment and Energy News (E&E News) reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Project goal: To create an environmentally friendly and sustainable alternative to leather, in this case using fungi.

Read More Show Less
Plastic waste is bulldozed at a landfill. Needpix

The plastic recycling model was never economically viable, but oil and gas companies still touted it as a magic solution to waste, selling the American public a lie so the companies could keep pushing new plastic.

Read More Show Less
54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Maria Symchych-Navrotska / Getty Images

By Pamela Davis-Kean

With in-person instruction becoming the exception rather than the norm, 54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Initial projections from the Northwest Evaluation Association, which conducts research and creates commonly used standardized tests, suggest that these fears are well-grounded, especially for children from low-income families.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch