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CBS Reporter Ben Swann Tells the Truth About CDC Vaccine Cover-Up

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Finally, courageous Atlanta CBS reporter Ben Swann tells the truth about the Center for Disease Control (CDC) whistleblower, the most censored story of the millennium. CDC's senior vaccine safety scientist, Dr. William Thompson, has confessed that the CDC vaccine division has been concealing the link between certain vaccines and brain injuries including tics and autism, particularly in African-American children.

Watch Swann's coverage here:

Thompson says that he and his four colleagues were forced by CDC bosses to bring data from a 2004 study of the links between the MMR vaccine [Measles, Mumps and Rubella] and autism into a small conference room at the CDC. To their great surprise, the data showed a 250 percent increased risk for African-American boys who were given the MMR vaccine prior to their third birthday—as recommended by CDC—compared to boys who delayed the vaccine.

The four scientists, under instructions from their CDC superiors dumped all of the data related to the African-American boys into a large trash can and destroyed it. The agency then published the study with the damaging data omitted. That study, now cited in more than 110 publications, is the cornerstone of CDC's theology that's vaccines are not causing autism.

A conscience stricken Thompson, who kept copies of the documents that were destroyed, has invoked federal whistleblower status and handed over the more than 100,000 pages of incriminating documents to Congress. Thompson has asked to be subpoenaed to testify about the corruption at the CDC but the Congressional Government Oversight Committee, drowning in Pharma cash, has so far refused to hold hearings on this extraordinary scandal. Meanwhile the corporate media, particularly the Atlanta-based CNN has thoroughly suppressed the story.

Here are quotes from Thompson explaining the CDC cover-up:

  • “I regret that my coauthors and I omitted statistically significant information in our 2004 article published in the journal Pediatrics. The omitted data suggested that African American males who received the MMR vaccine before age 36 months were at increased risk for autism." —CDC Senior Vaccine Safety Scientist, Dr. William Thompson, through his lawyer, August 2014
  • “The adjusted race-effect [for black boys and autism], statistical significance was huge."
  • “After the meeting we decided to exclude reporting any race effects [showing elevated autism in black boys], the co-authors scheduled a meeting to destroy documents related to the study. The remaining four co-authors all met and brought a big garbage can into the meeting room and reviewed and went through all the hard copy documents that we had thought we should discard and put them in a huge garbage can. I believe we intentionally withheld controversial findings from the final draft of the Pediatrics paper." —Dr. William Thompson's deposition with Congressman Bill Posey
  • “I have a boss who is asking me to lie … I'm not going to lie. I basically have stopped lying."
  • “You know, in the United States, the only mercury containing vaccine is for pregnant women. I can say confidently I do think thimerosal causes tics (Tourette's syndrome). So I don't know why they still give it to pregnant women. Like that's the last person that I would give mercury to."
  • “Thimerosal from vaccines cause tics."
  • “Do you think a pregnant mother would want to take a vaccine that they know caused tics? Absolutely not! I would never give my wife a vaccine that I thought caused tics. I can say tics are four times more prevalent in kids with autism."
  • There is biologic plausibility right now to say that thimerosal causes autism-like features."
  • “I have great shame now when I meet a family with kids with autism, because I have been a part of the problem."
  • “I shoulder that the CDC has put the research ten years behind. Because the CDC has not been transparent, we've missed ten years of research, because the CDC is so paralyzed right now by anything related to autism. They're not doing what they should be doing. They are afraid to look for things that might be associated."
  • “The higher ups wanted to do certain things and I went along with it. I was, in terms of chain in command, I was number four out of the five. Colleen was the Division Chief ... Frank is the Director of Immunization Safety. They are still all much more senior than me."

For a brilliant chronicle of CDC's perfidy, watch the extraordinary documentary Trace Amounts. Here's the trailer:

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