Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

What Is CBD Water, and Should You Drink It?

Health + Wellness
CBD lemonade and CBD ciders in the Erewhon store in Venice, California. Irma Omerhodzic

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is a popular product that has garnered increasing attention over the past few years.


Health shops have begun carrying CBD-infused capsules, gummies, vapes, and more.

CBD water has also become widely available recently, drawing praise and criticism.

This article examines CBD water to help you determine whether it's worth buying.

What Is CBD Water?

CBD is a chemical compound found in the cannabis plant.

Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD is not psychoactive. Thus, it doesn't produce the same high that's associated with THC or marijuana (1Trusted Source).

CBD has been well studied for its medicinal properties. Research suggests it may relieve chronic pain and help reduce anxiety and inflammation (2Trusted Source, 3Trusted Source, 4Trusted Source).

You can now buy a variety of CBD products, including oils, capsules, and gummies, among other edibles.

CBD water, which is made by infusing water with CBD particles, is one of the newest forms to hit the market.

Manufacturers claim that drinking it can be an easy way to get your CBD fix and reap its potential health benefits.

Summary

CBD is a compound found in marijuana that has been associated with many health benefits. CBD-infused water is now available, alongside an array of other CBD products, including oils, gummies, and capsules.

CBD Water Contains Minimal Amounts of CBD

One of the main problems with CBD water is that most brands contain very little CBD.

The amount in each serving fluctuates by brand, but most provide around 2–5 mg.

Although dosage recommendations can vary, most studies evaluating this compound's beneficial effects have used doses of at least 15 mg per day (5Trusted Source).

Many companies justify their products' low CBD content by claiming that they use nanotechnology to decrease particle size and boost your body's ability to absorb and utilize CBD.

Research on the effects of nanotechnology on CBD absorption is limited. However, one study found that lipid-based CBD nanoparticles may be better absorbed by your body (6Trusted Source).

More studies are needed to determine whether using nanoparticles in CBD water has any effect on absorption.

Summary

CBD water usually contains low doses of CBD. Many brands claim to use nanotechnology to increase absorption, but it's unclear whether this it's effective.

Light and Air Degrade CBD

CBD is a highly unstable compound that requires careful preparation and storage to help preserve its medicinal properties.

In particular, exposure to light and air can cause it to break down, negating its potential beneficial effects.

Most CBD water is stored on grocery shelves under bright lights in clear containers for days or even weeks, degrading its CBD content.

One study evaluated the effects of certain storage conditions on cannabinoids and found that exposure to light caused the greatest loss of CBD (7Trusted Source).

Temperature had no effect, but exposure to air also led to significant losses in cannabinoid content. Therefore, as soon as you open CBD water, the little CBD it contains immediately begins to break down (7Trusted Source).

Although more studies are needed, these findings suggest that CBD water is unlikely to have much of a medicinal impact.

Summary

Light and air can cause CBD to break down, negating its potential health benefits. CBD water is often sold in clear bottles, so the CBD inside may have already broken down significantly by the time you drink it.

CBD Water Is Expensive

If you're looking to try CBD, drinking CBD water is one of the most expensive routes to take.

A single 16-ounce (473-ml) serving can cost around $4–7 USD, excluding tax and shipping.

Buying in bulk can help you save money, but each bottle still comes out to at least $3 USD.

This is significantly more pricey than other forms of CBD.

For example, CBD oil typically costs around $35–40 for about 30 servings, which equates to less than $2 per serving.

CBD capsules, gummies, vapes, and creams can also provide a good amount of CBD for a lower cost per serving.

Summary

CBD water is more expensive than other forms of CBD, including capsules, gummies, vapes, and creams.

Should You Drink CBD Water?

CBD may offer various benefits, but CBD water contains minimal amounts.

Also, it's more expensive and likely less effective than most other CBD products.

In fact, given that this compound loses its medicinal properties when exposed to air or light, CBD water is unlikely to provide any benefits at all.

It's best to stick to other CBD products to take advantage of its medicinal properties.

CBD oil, capsules, gummies, and other edibles that come in dark-colored bottles are convenient and more cost-effective alternatives to CBD water.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less