Quantcast

Tainted Romaine Farm Recalls Cauliflower Now, Too

Health + Wellness
Pexels

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned consumers not to eat any romaine lettuce, due to a large outbreak of E. coli contamination. Now, Adams Bros Farming Inc, a huge farm in California, is recalling more products that may have been contaminated in the same way.


The initial romaine contamination has been linked to 59 illnesses, including 23 hospitalizations. An investigation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that there's one specific strain of E. coli involved here—it's called O157:H7—and after more than a month of DNA testing and tracing, the FDA finally found that same strain of E. coli in a reservoir at Adams Bros Farming Inc. The initial contaminated romaine, for timing's sake, was harvested from Nov. 27 to Nov. 30.

Because other products may have come in contact with the contaminated reservoir water, Adams Bros sent out a press release that the company is recalling a few other products: cauliflower, red leaf lettuce and green leaf lettuce. "Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. feels a strong commitment to its customers and has worked for years to provide a safe and healthy food supply. Out of an abundance of caution, Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. is initiating this voluntary recall in cooperation with the FDA," reads the release. The company notes that no illnesses have been reported from consumption of these products at this time.

But it's also worth noting that the FDA has not definitively decided that Adams Bros is the sole party responsible for this particular outbreak. From the FDA's updated page on the topic: "We advise avoiding romaine from Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Barbara counties in California."

You might be wondering why greens like romaine seem to constantly be at risk of pathogen contamination. A couple of years ago, we conducted an interview with Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety, to find out more about how pathogens are literally sealed into certain products. Check it out! And in the meantime, be careful what you eat.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Marlene Cimons

Scientist Aaswath Raman long has been keen on discovering new sources of clean energy by creating novel materials that can make use of heat and light.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD

The aloe vera plant is a succulent that stores water in its leaves in the form of a gel.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Attendees seen at the Inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration at Los Angeles Grand Park on Oct. 8, 2018 in Los Angeles. Chelsea Guglielmino / Getty Images

By Malinda Maynor Lowery

Increasingly, Columbus Day is giving people pause.

Read More Show Less
Westend61 / Getty Images

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Hunger is your body's natural cue that it needs more food.

Read More Show Less
Young activists and their supporters rally for action on climate change on Sept. 20 in New York City. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

More than 58 million people currently living in the U.S. — 17 percent of the population — are of Latin-American descent. By 2065 that percentage is expected to rise to nearly a quarter. Hardly a monolith, this diverse group includes people with roots in dozens of countries; they or their ancestors might have arrived here at any point between the 1500s and today. They differ culturally, linguistically and politically.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Thu Thai Thanh / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Commonly consumed vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, peppers, carrots, and cabbage, provide abundant nutrients and flavors. It's no wonder that they're among the most popular varieties worldwide.

Read More Show Less
Petrochemical facilities in the Houston ship channel. Roy Luck / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

Prigi Arisandi, who founded the environmental group Ecological Observation and Wetlands Conservation, picks through a heap of worn plastic packaging in Mojokerto, Indonesia. Reading the labels, he calls out where the trash originated: the United States, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canada. The logos range from Nestlé to Bob's Red Mill, Starbucks to Dunkin Donuts.

The trash of rich nations has become the burden of poorer countries.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Caffeine's popularity as a natural stimulant is unparalleled.

Read More Show Less