Quantcast

Tainted Romaine Farm Recalls Cauliflower Now, Too

Health + Wellness
Pexels

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned consumers not to eat any romaine lettuce, due to a large outbreak of E. coli contamination. Now, Adams Bros Farming Inc, a huge farm in California, is recalling more products that may have been contaminated in the same way.


The initial romaine contamination has been linked to 59 illnesses, including 23 hospitalizations. An investigation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that there's one specific strain of E. coli involved here—it's called O157:H7—and after more than a month of DNA testing and tracing, the FDA finally found that same strain of E. coli in a reservoir at Adams Bros Farming Inc. The initial contaminated romaine, for timing's sake, was harvested from Nov. 27 to Nov. 30.

Because other products may have come in contact with the contaminated reservoir water, Adams Bros sent out a press release that the company is recalling a few other products: cauliflower, red leaf lettuce and green leaf lettuce. "Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. feels a strong commitment to its customers and has worked for years to provide a safe and healthy food supply. Out of an abundance of caution, Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. is initiating this voluntary recall in cooperation with the FDA," reads the release. The company notes that no illnesses have been reported from consumption of these products at this time.

But it's also worth noting that the FDA has not definitively decided that Adams Bros is the sole party responsible for this particular outbreak. From the FDA's updated page on the topic: "We advise avoiding romaine from Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Barbara counties in California."

You might be wondering why greens like romaine seem to constantly be at risk of pathogen contamination. A couple of years ago, we conducted an interview with Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety, to find out more about how pathogens are literally sealed into certain products. Check it out! And in the meantime, be careful what you eat.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Adda Bjarnadottir, MS, LN

Up to 20% of people may have a food addiction or exhibit addictive-like eating behavior.

Read More Show Less
Spiced hot chocolate. Lilechka75 / iStock / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson, MScFN, RD

Food is the cornerstone of the holiday season. It brings friends and family together to share memories, cultural traditions, and great flavors.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Solar panels at the Renewable Hydrogen Fueling and Production Station on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. U.S. Navy / Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker / Released

By Tara Lohan

Three years into the Trump administration, its anti-climate and anti-science agenda is well established. Despite dire warnings from the world's leading scientists about the threats from rising greenhouse gas emissions, the administration has stubbornly continued to deny climate change, obstructed and undermined efforts to curb it, and moved again and again to roll back existing regulations that help reduce emissions.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Ryan Raman, MS, RD

Rye bread tends to have a darker color and stronger, earthier taste than regular white and wheat bread, which is one reason why many people enjoy it.

Read More Show Less
Elva Etienne / Moment / Getty Images

By Ketura Persellin

Gift-giving is filled with minefields, but the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) got your back, so you don't need to worry about inadvertently giving family members presents laden with toxic chemicals. With that in mind, here are our suggestions for gifts to give your family this season.

Read More Show Less