Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Capitalism vs. The Climate: Stephen Colbert Talks To Naomi Klein

Climate
Capitalism vs. The Climate: Stephen Colbert Talks To Naomi Klein

Author Naomi Klein, who just released her new book This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate, was Stephen Colbert's guest on Comedy Central's The Colbert Report last night, explaining to the straight-man host why capitalism might be good for him personally but not for the Earth.

Lobbing her softballs in the form of affable iterations of stock climate denier statements like "I don't deny climate change, it's happening I just don't know if we need to do anything about it," and "I fly over the country all the time, it's green out there, there's lakes, there's rivers, it's a beautiful world—it's all cyclical," Colbert provided her openings to explain her book's thesis—that capitalism, with its demands for constant growth to fuel profit, must be scrapped to reverse climate change.

"I haven't finished reading the book," said Colbert. "I don't want to know who wins, capitalism or the climate. But I assume it's capitalism because the book costs $30 and it's printed on dead trees."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

'This Changes Everything' Including the Anti-Fracking Movement

Naomi Klein on Democracy Now! Discussing Capitalism vs. the Climate

Colbert Mocks Media's Coverage of Obama's ‘War on Coal'

One of the beavers released into England's Somerset county this January, which has now helped build the area's first dam in more than 400 years. Ben Birchall / PA Images via Getty Images

England's Somerset county can now boast its first beaver dam in more than 400 years.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Australia's dingo fences, built to protect livestock from wild dogs, stretch for thousands of miles. Marian Deschain / Wikimedia

By Alex McInturff, Christine Wilkinson and Wenjing Xu

What is the most common form of human infrastructure in the world? It may well be the fence. Recent estimates suggest that the total length of all fencing around the globe is 10 times greater than the total length of roads. If our planet's fences were stretched end to end, they would likely bridge the distance from Earth to the Sun multiple times.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Hopi blue corn is being affected by climate change. Abrahami / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Climate change is making ancient Hopi farming nearly impossible, threatening not just the Tribe's staple food source, but a pillar of its culture and religion, the Arizona Republic reports.

Read More Show Less
Pollution on the Ganges River. Kaushik Ghosh / Moment Open / Getty Images

The most polluted river in the world continues to be exploited through fishing practices that threaten endangered wildlife, new research shows.

Read More Show Less
Oil spills, such as the one in Mauritius in August 2020, could soon be among the ecological crimes considered ecocide. - / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

An expert panel of top international and environmental lawyers have begun working this month on a legal definition of "ecocide" with the goal of making mass ecological damage an enforceable international crime on par with war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

Read More Show Less