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Where Are We on Cannabis Edibles (and Drinkables)?

Insights + Opinion
HighGradeRoots / iStock / Getty Images

Let's start the new year off with a look at what's happening with Cannabis, a food politics topic because of its edibles.


First, the legal status

The word is that the market for Cannabis products—including edibles and drinkables—constitutes a "21st century gold rush," despite their illegal regulatory status in the U.S.

Illegal? Here's what the the FDA says:

12, Can products that contain THC or cannabidiol (CBD) be sold as dietary supplements?
A. No.

13, Is it legal, in interstate commerce, to sell a food to which THC or CBD has been added?
A. No

As for the status of Cannabis in Canada, the details are here. Cannabis became legal in October, with some amusing results, here. And then, there's the question of Cannabis-infused beer, of all things:

Cannabis-infused beer gets lots of attention, but craft brewers are worried about the competition.

What About Research on the Effects of THC?

It's been difficult to do it because of restrictions on illegal substances, but because the Farm Bill took hemp off the list, observers are hopeful that research possibilities will open up.

In the meantime, some research is ongoing. For example: Cannabis increases appetite but whether it causes weight gain is still uncertain.

We will be hearing a lot more about this topic, I predict. Stay tuned.

Happy new year, stoned or not.

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