Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Candle-Powered Egloo Revolutionizes How You Heat Your Home

Business
Candle-Powered Egloo Revolutionizes How You Heat Your Home

Maybe it's the idea of saving money on home heating. Maybe it's about being environmentally friendly. Or maybe it's just that the object in question is sleek, spare and a bit mysterious-looking.

The Egloo is lightweight and requires no connection to a power source so it can be taken anywhere. Photo credit: Egloo

Whatever the reason, the Egloo home heater, an idea hatched by Italian entrepreneur Mario Zagaria who calls himself an "interaction designer," blew past its Indiegogo crowdfunding goal in four days and has already raised almost four times its initial goal of $30,000. With two weeks left in its campaign, it's closing in on $120,000. That's good news because it means the Egloo will go into production and could be in your hands by March.

"Egloo is conceived for contrasting continuous waste of electricity used for warming domestic environments, offering as an option a candle-powered way that provides a cheaper and more ecological energy, taking advantage of features of terracotta that stores the heat and slowly and gradually releases it by radiation, even after it blows out," says Zagaria.

Zagaria explained why he chose to use terracotta, a material common in gardens all over Italy.

"Terracotta is a non-metallic, very ductile inorganic compound used for heat-resistant covering due to its chemicophysical features and its high melting point," he said. "Terracotta is a material particularly suitable for Egloo because the heat, rapidly stored, is slowly and gradually conveyed to the environment by thermal radiation."

The Egloo is simple to assemble and doesn't feature any complicated mechanical parts. Photo credit: Egloo

The Egloo requires four candles, each with a burning time of about five hours. They're set on a base with a metal grill over which a pair of domes are positioned in such a way as to provide air circulation for the candles. A thinner inside dome stores the heat and sends it to the outer dome which has an opening to take in oxygen and feed the heat back into the surrounding environment.

"After only 30 minutes the temperature of the environment surrounding the Egloo will be increased between 2 and 3 degrees," says Zagaria. (That's equivalent to about 5 degrees Fahrenheit.)

Not only is the Egloo environmentally friendly and easy on your electric bill, but its design resembles something you'd buy in a museum shop or a high-end home furnishing store. It's likely to be quite a conversation piece. And, at about seven inches wide and weighing slightly more than two pounds, it's not a space hog either and it's easy to take out to your porch or patio if the evening gets a little cool.

With an array of colors, both glazed and non-glazer, the Egloo fits the decor of any space. Photo credit: Egloo

The Egloo, which comes in white, black, beige, natural red and blue, is sold with eight candles, with prices ranging from $80 to $110. There's also a ten-pack of Egloos—heat your whole home!—available for $750. Zagaria promised that if the campaign were successful (and it obviously has been) the Egloo would go into production in February and ship in March.

Check out this cool video of an Egloos being made:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Wind Turbine Trees Generate Renewable Energy for Urban Settings

Could Your Lawn Power Your House?

Solar Light Solution for 1.6 Billion People Living Without Electricity

A group of climate activists that have been cycling from the North of the country in stages to draw attention to the climate case are arriving to the Court of Justice on the day that the climate lawsuit against Shell starts in The Hague, on December 1st, 2020. Romy Arroyo Fernandez / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Representing more than 17,000 claimants who support climate action, the international organization Friends of the Earth on Tuesday opened its case against fossil fuel giant Shell at The Hague by demanding that a judge order the corporation to significantly reduce its carbon emissions in the next decade.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Eat Just, Inc. announced that its cultured chicken has been approved for sale in Singapore as an ingredient in chicken bites. The company has developed other cultured chicken formats as well. Eat Just

As concern mounts over the environmental impacts of animal agriculture, Singapore has issued the world's first regulatory approval for lab-grown meat.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wildfires are seen burning out of control on November 30, 2020 on Fraser Island, Australia. Queensland Fire and Emergency Services / Getty Images

The world's largest sand island has been on fire for the past six weeks due to a campfire, and Australia's firefighters have yet to prevent flames from destroying the fragile ecosystem.

Read More Show Less
A plane sprays pesticide over the Wynwood neighborhood in the hope of controlling and reducing the number of mosquitos, some of which may be capable of spreading the Zika virus on Aug. 6, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A national nonprofit revealed Tuesday that testing commissioned by the group as well as separate analysis conducted by Massachusetts officials show samples of an aerially sprayed pesticide used by the commonwealth and at least 25 other states to control mosquito-borne illnesses contain toxic substances that critics call "forever chemicals."

Read More Show Less
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern plants a tree as part of Trees That Count, a project to help New Zealand make a positive impact on climate change, on June 30, 2019 in Wellington, New Zealand. Hagen Hopkins / Getty Images

The government of New Zealand declared a climate emergency on Wednesday, a symbolic step recognizing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predictions of substantial global warming if emissions do not fall.

Read More Show Less