Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Canada's Trudeau to DiCaprio: Tone Down 'Inflammatory Rhetoric' on Climate Change

Climate
Canada's Trudeau to DiCaprio: Tone Down 'Inflammatory Rhetoric' on Climate Change

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told Leonardo DiCaprio to tone down his "inflammatory rhetoric" on climate change, arguing it was not helping those who have lost their oil industry jobs.

Last week, DiCaprio blasted the “corporate greed of the coal, oil and gas industries” and said "enough is enough" in a speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“We simply cannot afford to allow the corporate greed of the coal, oil and gas industries to determine the future of humanity. Those entities with a financial interest in preserving this destructive system have denied, and even covered up the evidence of our changing climate," DiCaprio said. "You know better. The world knows better. History will place the blame for this devastation squarely at their feet."

At a dinner later that day, Trudeau chided the actor and activist for his remarks. "I pointed out that both Alberta and Canada have new governments over the past year that are committed to action on climate change ... and that there are families suffering, out of work, who need to be supported, and inflammatory rhetoric doesn't necessarily help those families or help Canada," Trudeau told reporters on Friday.

"He actually said if we took concrete action on climate change, he would be the first to come up and celebrate with us," Trudeau added.

The Canadian prime minister also spoke at the economic summit last week, telling the audience of business and government elites that "Canada was open for business, and that his government plans to invest heavily in low-carbon industries," Vice News reported.

DiCaprio has been critical of Canada's energy policies in the past, particularly the tar sands. According to Vice, DiCaprio called out the oil industry in 2014 after traveling to the Albertan tar sands while filming a documentary.

"They drill, they extract, making trillions of dollars," he said. "We must fight to keep this carbon in the ground."

And in an interview with Charlie Rose earlier this month, DiCaprio cited the tar sands as evidence that “we’re systemically destroying … our planet on an unprecedented scale in human history.”

DiCaprio was at the World Economic Forum to accept an award for making important contributions to improving the state of the world. He was recognized for his work in tackling climate change through his Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and as an UN Messenger of Peace. He announced during his speech that his foundation would be pledging a new commitment of $15 million to environmental projects.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Leonardo DiCaprio: ‘Enough Is Enough’ Corporate Greed Must Stop

NASA Scientist Dying of Cancer Attacked by Climate Deniers

Armed Ships Embark on Secretive Plutonium Mission From Japan to the U.S.

Half of U.S. Fracking Industry Could Go Bankrupt as Oil Prices Continue to Fall

Yves Adams / Instagram

A rare yellow penguin has been photographed for what is believed to be the first time.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Crystal building in London, England is the first building in the world to be awarded an outstanding BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) rating and a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum rating. Alphotographic / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

We spend 90% of our time in the buildings where we live and work, shop and conduct business, in the structures that keep us warm in winter and cool in summer.

But immense energy is required to source and manufacture building materials, to power construction sites, to maintain and renew the built environment. In 2019, building operations and construction activities together accounted for 38% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, the highest level ever recorded.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Houses and wooden debris are shown in flood waters from Hurricane Katrina Sept. 11, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Jerry Grayson / Helifilms Australia PTY Ltd / Getty Images

By Eric Tate and Christopher Emrich

Disasters stemming from hazards like floods, wildfires, and disease often garner attention because of their extreme conditions and heavy societal impacts. Although the nature of the damage may vary, major disasters are alike in that socially vulnerable populations often experience the worst repercussions. For example, we saw this following Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, each of which generated widespread physical damage and outsized impacts to low-income and minority survivors.

Read More Show Less
A gray wolf is seen howling outside in winter. Wolfgang Kaehler / Contributor / Getty Images

Wisconsin will end its controversial wolf hunt early after hunters and trappers killed almost 70 percent of the state's quota in the hunt's first 48 hours.

Read More Show Less
Tom Vilsack speaks on December 11, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware after being nominated to be Agriculture Secretary by U.S. President Joe Biden. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Tuesday was the lone progressive to vote against Tom Vilsack reprising his role as secretary of agriculture, citing concerns that progressive advocacy groups have been raising since even before President Joe Biden officially nominated the former Obama administration appointee.

Read More Show Less