Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Pipeline Protestors Are Still Blocking Railways in Canada, Paralyzing the Nation's Rail System

Energy
Pipeline Protestors Are Still Blocking Railways in Canada, Paralyzing the Nation's Rail System
Protesters holding signs in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en Nation outside the Canadian Consulate in NYC. The Indigenous Peoples Day NYC Committee (IPDNYC), a coalition of 13 Indigenous Peoples and indigenous-led organizations gathered outside the Canadian Consulate and Permanent Mission to the UN to support the Wet'suwet'en Nation in their opposition to a Coastal GasLink pipeline scheduled to enter their traditional territory in British Columbia, Canada. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

Tensions are continuing to rise in Canada over a controversial pipeline project as protesters enter their 12th day blockading railways, demonstrating on streets and highways, and paralyzing the nation's rail system


The arrest of dozens of people, including some Wet'suwet'en Nation leaders, earlier this month for blockading railways in protest of the $4.6 billion TransCanada Coastal GasLink pipeline sparked sympathy protests across the country. The protests bring up longstanding questions over Indigenous land rights in the region, illustrated by the years-long fight by the Wet'suwet'en against the pipeline, which some members of the tribe say is being illegally built on their territory. Two Canadian railways said they would temporarily lay off hundreds of employees as travel and trade stalls, and the crisis represents a major challenge for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

For a deeper dive:

LA Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, CBC, BBC, WSJ, Michael Taube op-ed

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

The majority of voters support a transition to renewable energy, including wind and solar. paedwards / Needpix

By Jessica Corbett

With an estimated 66 million ballots already cast and only a week to go until Election Day, new polling released Tuesday shows the vast majority of U.S. voters believe the nation should be prioritizing a transition to 100% clean energy and support legislation to decarbonize the economy over the next few decades.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Researchers say they have observed methane being released along a wide swath of the slope of the Laptev Sea. Aerohod / CC BY-SA 4.0

Arctic Ocean sediments are full of frozen gases known as hydrates, and scientists have long been concerned about what will happen when and if the climate crisis induces them to thaw. That is because one of them is methane, a greenhouse gas that has 80 times the warming impact of carbon dioxide over a 20 year period. In fact, the U.S. Geological Survey has listed Arctic hydrate destabilization as one of the four most serious triggers for even more rapid climate change.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Are you noticing your shirts becoming too tight fitting to wear? Have you been regularly visiting a gym, yet it seems like your effort is not enough? It's okay to get disappointed, but not to lose hope.

Read More Show Less
Residents get in a car after leaving their homes to move to evacuation centers in central Vietnam's Quang Nam province on Oct. 27, 2020, ahead of Typhoon Molave's expected landfall. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP via Getty Images

Typhoon Molave is expected to make landfall in Vietnam on Wednesday with 90 mph winds and heavy rainfall that could lead to flooding and landslides, according to the U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City. To prepare for the powerful storm that already tore through the Philippines, Vietnam is making plans to evacuate nearly 1.3 million people along the central coast, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Chipotle's "Real Foodprint" will tell you the ecological footprint of each menu item compared to the industry standard. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

How does your burrito impact the environment? If you ordered it from Chipotle, there is now a way to find out.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch