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Camper You Pull With Your Bike Turns the World Into Your Backyard

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Camper You Pull With Your Bike Turns the World Into Your Backyard

Camping is a great way to enjoy the outdoors, but who says you need a car to get to your destination?

The camper in Timbble Fork Reservoir, Utah. Photo credit: Wide Path Camper

A Danish company has created the Wide Path Camper, a bicycle camper that allows you to tour the country on your two legs.

Granted, the trailer itself weighs 100 pounds, so unless you hook it onto an electric bike or have very strong legs, you'll be pedaling pretty slowly and perhaps not on steep or rocky terrain.

The tiny home on wheels, according to Outside Online, can haul up to 300 pounds of gear and be set up in less than five minutes.

The best part is that the trailer can expand from 39-by-51 inches for towing into 39-by-102 inches for camping.

The trailer has a hardshell exterior with an optional table for cooking and eating. Photo credit: Wide Path Camper

Inside the camper, there's a sitting area with a table that seats four people. The table can also convert into a bed for two.

The company is planning to add even more features, such as a sunroof and solar cells so you can power your electronic devices.

According to a Facebook post last month, the company is currently working on getting the product to U.S. and Canadian markets. The trailer costs $4,000.

Check out the Wide Path Camper in action below:

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