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Call Congress Today: Ask Your Rep. to Vote 'No' on the DARK Act

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Jenna Zimmerman is a junior at New York University where she studies marketing and sustainability. Jenna is passionate about her roll as director of communications at Turning Green. She plans to pursue a career in sustainability marketing as her generation rises as the most empowered consumers yet. 

There is currently a bill in Congress that would prevent GMO-labeling and deny consumers the right to know what's in their food.

"H.R. 1599, dubbed the 'Deny Americans the Right to Know' Act or DARK Act by opponents, would block state laws requiring GMO labeling," said Scott Faber of Environmental Working Group. "Three states have passed such laws and 17 considered similar laws in 2015. The DARK would also rob states of the ability to prevent food companies from claiming that GMO foods are 'natural.'”

Turning Green, a student lead non-profit dedicated to sustainability education and inspiring conscious lifestyle transitions, has created a call to action. It's a call to action to our peers, communities and policy makers.

“Don’t mind the nine out of 10 Americans who support GM food labeling—forget them! ... Let’s protect Big Food and biotechnology corporations by not calling [Congress],” Danielle Schoen, a Skidmore College junior, sarcastically states in the video.

The time to speak up is now.

Watch here:

Call your representative today and share these key points.

For calls, here is a sample script:

“Hi, my name is [NAME]. I am from [District] and I am one of the 9 out of 10 Americans who support GMO labeling. I am calling to ask you to oppose H.R. 1599. This will take away states and local rights to label and regulate genetically engineered crops. It will harm family farmers and it will undermine local rights of consumers to know what is in our food. Please protect farmers, states rights and my right to know and OPPOSE H.R. 1599. Thank you.”

We need you to pick up the phone right now. Click here to be automatically connected to your representative and urge him or her to support GMO labeling and vote "no" on H.R. 1599, the DARK Act.

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