Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

California Superbloom Is One Town’s #PoppyNightmare

Popular
California Superbloom Is One Town’s #PoppyNightmare
Poppy superbloom in Lake Elsinore, Calfornia on March 13. cultivar413 / CC BY 2.0

The hillsides dyed orange with poppies may look like something out of a dream, but for the Southern California town of Lake Elsinore, that dream quickly turned into a nightmare.

The town of 66,000 people was inundated with around 50,000 tourists coming to snap pictures of the golden poppies growing in Walker Canyon as part of a superbloom of wildfires caused by an unusually wet winter, BBC News reported. The visitors trampled flowers and caused hours of traffic, The Guardian reported.


"This weekend has been unbearable in Lake Elsinore," the city wrote on its Facebook and Instagram pages, according to The Guardian. "We know it has been miserable and has caused unnecessary hardships for our entire community."

City officials briefly closed access to the canyon Sunday night, but it was opened again Monday morning.

"The City continues to evaluate all possible options to reduce the strain on our community, the freeway, and local roadways. At this time, it is not feasible for us to keep visitors away from #WalkerCanyon," the city said in its post. "We are working on a new plan and new options for the coming weekend and will be sure to share this with our community as soon as possible."

Some have blamed social media for the crowds, as Instagram influencers posted selfies with themselves against a backdrop of flowers.

"We've seen much larger crowds this year because the bloom is bigger than ever," assistant to the Lake Elsinore city manager Nicole Dailey told BBC. "We're getting the crowd numbers Los Angeles gets for large sporting events," Dailey added. "Social media buzz has brought numbers that the city has never gone through before."

The incident began trending as #poppynightmare.

"One of our employees was hit and run by a driver. A rattlesnake bit a visitor. Residents have been screaming at the people directing traffic," Lake Elsinore Mayor Steve Manos said in a Facebook post reported by BBC.

However, while the poppies are causing problems for Lake Elsinore, they are a good sign for California, since the bloom signals that the state is drought-free for the first time in seven years, according to a video by Now This.

The Sierra Nevada snowpack is now 50 percent higher than average and all reservoirs are full, Al Jazeera reported. Just last year, 70 percent of the state was still at risk for water scarcity. However, scientists have said that swings from drought to extreme rainfall will become more common in California with climate change.

The rain and wildflower bloom have also led to a massive migration of Painted Lady butterflies through Southern California.
On Thursday, Maryland will become the first state in the nation to implement a ban on foam takeout containers. guruXOOX / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Maryland will become the first state in the nation Thursday to implement a ban on foam takeout containers.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sea turtle and tropical fish swim in Oahu, Hawaii. M.M. Sweet / Moment / Getty Images

By Ajit Niranjan

Leaders from across the world have promised to turn environmental degradation around and put nature on the path to recovery within a decade.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Smoke from the Glass Fire rises from the hills on September 27, 2020 in Calistoga, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Just days after a new report detailed the "unequivocal and pervasive role" climate change plays in the increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, new fires burned 10,000 acres on Sunday as a "dome" of hot, dry air over Northern California created ideal fire conditions over the weekend.

Read More Show Less
Sir David Attenborough speaks at the launch of the UK-hosted COP26 UN Climate Summit at the Science Museum on Feb. 4, 2020 in London, England. Jeremy Selwyn - WPA Pool / Getty Images

Sir David Attenborough wants to share a message about the climate crisis. And it looks like his fellow Earthlings are ready to listen.

Read More Show Less
People walk down a flooded street as they evacuate their homes after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Kevin T. Smiley

When hurricanes and other extreme storms unleash downpours like Tropical Storm Beta has been doing in the South, the floodwater doesn't always stay within the government's flood risk zones.

New research suggests that nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps indicate.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch