Quantcast

Could California Join China in Banning Gas Guzzlers?

Popular
iStock

After China announced plans to ban new diesel and gasoline-powered cars, California Gov. Jerry Brown is said to be considering the same option, according to Bloomberg.

"I've gotten messages from the governor asking, 'Why haven't we done something already?'" Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, told the publication. "The governor has certainly indicated an interest in why China can do this and not California."


Besides China, Britain, France, Norway and India have announced similar intentions to phase out conventional gas guzzlers to cut fossil fuel emissions and promote electric vehicles.

Under Brown's watch, the Golden State has become an environmental powerhouse and it's no surprise that he would be consider such an idea. In June, Brown signed a nonbinding agreement with China to cooperate on renewable energy technology, including zero-emissions vehicles and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Brown and Chinese President Xi Jinping discussed "the importance of expanding cooperation of green technology, innovation and trade," according to the governor's office.

The governor has also been outspoken against President Trump's inaction on climate change and his controversial decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement.

It's unclear if the ban is serious. However, as Gina Coplon-Newfield, who heads the Sierra Club's clean transportation unit, told the New York Times, "It's an important conversation to have and we're glad it's starting to get some traction."

As the Times noted, while California happens to be the nation's top EV-adopter, sales in the state counts for less than 5 percent of the total.

Still, EV registration in the U.S. has grown significantly in recent years, from 17,425 registrations in 2011 to 209,726 this year already, according to a recent analysis from motor financing company Moneybarn.

Additionally, zero-emission vehicles are expected to be cheaper than conventional cars due to falling battery prices as well as the costs that traditional carmakers will incur as they comply with new fuel-efficiency standards.

"Falling battery costs will mean electric vehicles will also be cheaper to buy in the U.S. and Europe as soon as 2025," a Bloomberg New Energy Finance said. "Batteries currently account for about half the cost of EVs, and their prices will fall by about 77 percent between 2016 and 2030."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Mapping Urban Heat through Portland State University / video

Concrete and asphalt absorb the sun's energy. So when a heat wave strikes, city neighborhoods with few trees and lots of black pavement can get hotter than other areas — a lot hotter.

Read More
Pexels

By Ryan Raman, MS, RD

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin, meaning your body can't produce it. Yet, it has many roles and has been linked to impressive health benefits.

Read More
Sponsored
The Rio San Antonio, in the headwaters basin of the Rio Grande in New Mexico, will lose federal protections under a new rule. Bob Wick / BLM California

By Tara Lohan

The Santa Fe River starts high in the forests of New Mexico's Sangre de Cristo mountains and flows 46 miles to the Rio Grande. Along the way it plays important roles for wildlife, irrigation, recreation and other cultural uses, and provides 40 percent of the water supply for the city of Santa Fe's 85,000 residents.

Read More
Climate activists protest Chase Bank's continued funding of the fossil fuel industry on May 16, 2019 by setting up a tripod-blockade in midtown Manhattan, clogging traffic for over an hour. Michael Nigro / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Climate campaigners on Friday expressed hope that policymakers who are stalling on taking decisive climate action would reconsider their stance in light of new warnings from an unlikely source: two economists at J.P. Morgan Chase.

Read More
Protesters holding signs in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en Nation outside the Canadian Consulate in NYC. The Indigenous Peoples Day NYC Committee (IPDNYC), a coalition of 13 Indigenous Peoples and indigenous-led organizations gathered outside the Canadian Consulate and Permanent Mission to the UN to support the Wet'suwet'en Nation in their opposition to a Coastal GasLink pipeline scheduled to enter their traditional territory in British Columbia, Canada. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

Tensions are continuing to rise in Canada over a controversial pipeline project as protesters enter their 12th day blockading railways, demonstrating on streets and highways, and paralyzing the nation's rail system

Read More