Quantcast

California Electric Car Boom Accounts For 40 Percent of U.S. Sales

Business

In the last four years, 250,000 electric vehicles were sold in the U.S. and 40 percent of those—102,440— were sold in California, according to the Plug-In Electric Vehicle Collaborative. That includes both battery-driven and hybrid cars. Palo Alto-based Tesla, which just announced the construction of a massive battery factory in next-door Nevada, is responsible for 10 percent of those sales.

Tesla's electric vehicles have proved popular in California where stricter emissions standards have fueled sales.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

“California’s plug-in electric vehicle market is ramping up, and we expect to see significant growth over the next ten years as customers realize how economical and convenient they are,” said California Plug-In Electric Vehicle Collaborative executive director Christine Kehoe.

California has been in the forefront of pushing for the adoption of fuel-efficient vehicles. It's been leaning on automakers to lower tailpipe emissions since the ’70s, and in 2009, the state set new, tougher standards under its Zero-Emission Vehicle program, fueling the boom in EVs. Governor Jerry Brown has set a goal of 1.5 million electric vehicles on the road in the state by 2025.

That means more charging stations are needed to keep the cars running. Currently, more than a quarter of the charging stations in the U.S. are in California, with growing demand. The San Jose Mercury News reported in January the EV owners at Silicon Valley companies are fighting over the chargers at their work places.

ChargePoint, the world's largest EV charging network, opening 500 new stations a month internationally, is one of the companies installing such public charging stations in California.

"Gasoline is four dollars a gallon in California and rising," pointed out ChargePoint founder and chief technical officer Richard Lowenthal. "Consumers want alternatives and we're here to help make the best alternative—electricity—more accessible, and to make electric vehicles more appealing.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

May Marks Best-Ever Sales Month for EVs

Tesla Announces Huge Renewable Energy-Fueled Battery Factory Near Reno

3 EV Trends This Car-Buying Season

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A harbour seal on an ice floe in Glacier Bay, Alaska. A new study shows that the climate crisis has warmed waters, changing ecosystems and crippling sea ice growth. Janette Hill / robertharding / Getty Images Plus

The climate crisis is accelerating the rate of change in Alaska's marine ecosystem far faster than scientists had previously thought, causing possibly irreversible changes, according to new research, as Newsweek reported.

Read More
Doctors report that only 1 in 4 children are getting the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Ronnie Kaufman / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Dan Gray

Pediatricians are being urged to start writing "exercise prescriptions" for the children they see in their office.

Read More
Sponsored
A First Nations protester walks in front of a train blockade in Tyendinaga, near Belleville, Ontario, Canada on Feb. 21, 2020. LARS HAGBERG / AFP via Getty Images

An indigenous rail blockade that snarled train travel in Canada for more than two weeks came to an end Monday when police moved in to clear protesters acting in solidarity with another indigenous community in British Columbia (B.C.), which is fighting to keep a natural gas pipeline off its land.

Read More
A rainbow snake, a rare reptile spotted in a Florida county for the first time in more than 50 years, seen here on July 5, 2013. Kevin Enge / FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute / Flickr

A Florida hiker recently stumbled across a slithering surprise — a rare snake that hadn't been spotted in the area for more than 50 years.

Read More
We need our government to do everything it can to stop PFAS contamination and exposure from wreaking havoc in communities across the country. LuAnn Hun / Unsplash

By Genna Reed

The EPA announced last week that it is issuing a preliminary regulatory determination for public comment to set an enforceable drinking water standard to two of the most common and well-studied PFAS, PFOA and PFOS.

This decision is based on three criteria:

  1. PFOA and PFOS have an adverse effect on public health
  2. PFOA and PFOS occur in drinking water often enough and at levels of public health concern;
  3. regulation of PFOA and PFOS is a meaningful opportunity for reducing the health risk to those served by public water systems.
Read More