Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

How California's Cap-And-Trade Program Offers Hope For Disadvantaged Communities

Popular
How California's Cap-And-Trade Program Offers Hope For Disadvantaged Communities
Fresno, California, seen above, is receiving $66 million for walking trails, sidewalks, bike lanes, and more. DenisTangneyJr / iStock / Getty Images

Grecia Elenes grew up in Fresno, California. She says some parts of the city have been neglected for decades. When she moved back after college she realized nothing has changed.


"You see the same vacant lots. You see the same liquor stores," she says. "There's still no parks. You have the same missing sidewalks."

Now, she has hope that change is coming.

Elenes works as a policy advocate with the nonprofit Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability.

She says that as part of California's cap-and-trade program, major polluters in the state are charged for the carbon emissions they generate.

Some of that money is set aside for programs that both promote economic development and cut carbon pollution in disadvantaged communities. The state awarded Fresno more than $66 million for improvements in a five square mile area.

"That has historically not received any type of investment," Elenes says, "to transform the community in the way that the community sees fit." New infrastructure might include walking trails, sidewalks, or bike lanes, she says.

These amenities can help cut carbon pollution because they help create walkable neighborhoods. They also improve health and quality of life.

"I really hope it will catalyze a transformation that this community so rightly deserves," Elenes says.

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Yves Adams / Instagram

A rare yellow penguin has been photographed for what is believed to be the first time.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Crystal building in London, England is the first building in the world to be awarded an outstanding BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) rating and a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum rating. Alphotographic / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

We spend 90% of our time in the buildings where we live and work, shop and conduct business, in the structures that keep us warm in winter and cool in summer.

But immense energy is required to source and manufacture building materials, to power construction sites, to maintain and renew the built environment. In 2019, building operations and construction activities together accounted for 38% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, the highest level ever recorded.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Houses and wooden debris are shown in flood waters from Hurricane Katrina Sept. 11, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Jerry Grayson / Helifilms Australia PTY Ltd / Getty Images

By Eric Tate and Christopher Emrich

Disasters stemming from hazards like floods, wildfires, and disease often garner attention because of their extreme conditions and heavy societal impacts. Although the nature of the damage may vary, major disasters are alike in that socially vulnerable populations often experience the worst repercussions. For example, we saw this following Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, each of which generated widespread physical damage and outsized impacts to low-income and minority survivors.

Read More Show Less
A gray wolf is seen howling outside in winter. Wolfgang Kaehler / Contributor / Getty Images

Wisconsin will end its controversial wolf hunt early after hunters and trappers killed almost 70 percent of the state's quota in the hunt's first 48 hours.

Read More Show Less
Tom Vilsack speaks on December 11, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware after being nominated to be Agriculture Secretary by U.S. President Joe Biden. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Tuesday was the lone progressive to vote against Tom Vilsack reprising his role as secretary of agriculture, citing concerns that progressive advocacy groups have been raising since even before President Joe Biden officially nominated the former Obama administration appointee.

Read More Show Less