Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

California Becomes First State to Ban Single-Use Hotel Toiletries

Popular
California Becomes First State to Ban Single-Use Hotel Toiletries

valeriysurujiu / iStock / Getty Images Plus

California became the first state in the nation to ban hotels from offering mini toiletries in plastic bottles Wednesday when Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill to that effect into law.


Assemblyman Ash Kalra, D-San Jose, who sponsored the bill, applauded the governor's action.

"We have reached a tipping point for action and more needs to be done that transitions consumers and businesses towards more sustainable alternatives," Kalra said in a statement reported by The Sacramento Bee. "And given our state's large presence in tourism, this will be a model for the nation."

The travel industry has already started to make this change on their own, USA Today pointed out. The Walt Disney Co. said last year it would stop using single-use shampoo bottles in resorts and on cruise ships. Then, this July, InterContinental Hotels Group became the first hotel company to promise to phase out the mini bottles across all of its brands and properties. Marriott, the world's largest hotel chian, followed suit with a similar pledge a month later. The bill was even supported by the California Hotel and Lodging Association (CHLA).

"As long-time advocates of environmental stewardship, CHLA applauds Gov. Newsom and Assemblymember Kalra for working with California hotels to make AB 1162 good for our environment and for our industry," CHLA President and CEO Lynn S. Mohrfeld said in a statement reported by The San Jose Spotlight. "We especially appreciate Assemblymember Kalra's recognition of the many innovative steps hotels have taken to make a more sustainable future."

The bill gives large hotels until Jan. 2023 to phase out the tiny shampoos, conditioners and soaps. Hotels with fewer than 50 beds will have until Jan. 2024. After that date, hotels found in violation will face fines. The first violation would trigger a warning and a $500 fine for every day the law is violated. A second violation would cost the establishment $2,000, CNN explained. The law will not apply to nursing homes, hospitals, prisons or homeless shelters.

The bill was opposed by the Personal Care Products Council, which claims it "will impact personal care product manufacturers significantly, including small and medium sized companies that may be re-packers or distributors," The Sacramento Bee reported.

Its passage comes as concerns mount about plastic pollution, which enters the world's oceans at a rate of at least eight million tons a year. California has long been a national leader in tackling this problem, as CNN pointed out. In 2014, it became the first state to ban plastic bags.

Other states may follow its lead on mini hotel bottles as well. New York Sen. Todd Kaminsky has sponsored a bill that would do the same in the Empire State.


"Little everyday actions, like eliminating small plastic bottles, will have a positive impact on our environment," Kaminsky said in a press release reported by CNN. "By barring hotels from giving single-use plastic toiletries to customers, we are safeguarding our environment, and mitigating plastic waste and waterway pollution."

Pexels

By Jessica Corbett

A new study is shedding light on just how much ice could be lost around Antarctica if the international community fails to urgently rein in planet-heating emissions, bolstering arguments for bolder climate policies.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found that over a third of the area of all Antarctic ice shelves — including 67% of area on the Antarctic Peninsula — could be at risk of collapsing if global temperatures soar to 4°C above pre-industrial levels.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less