Quantcast

Businesses Unite for Swimmable, Fishable and Drinkable Water

California Coastkeeper Alliance and 12 local Waterkeeper organizations announced yesterday the launch of the Blue Business Council, a network of California businesses working to protect the state’s most valuable and threatened natural capital—its coast, ocean, bays, rivers and streams.

California's ocean economy is valued at more than $39 billion annually.

The Blue Business Council’s founding members are a diverse group of like-minded businesses spanning California from La Jolla to Humboldt. The founding Council members include, Patagonia, New Belgium Brewing, Clif Bar, REI, Pura Vida Bracelets, Santa Barbara Adventure Company, Channel Island Outfitters, Pro SUP Shop, Shelter Co., Humboldt Bay Oyster & Tourism, Hotel Healdsburg and h2hotel.

“As an outdoor business with our headquarters in coastal California for 40 years, we care deeply about protecting and cleaning-up our waterways to ensure that they are swimmable, fishable and drinkable," said Hans Cole, environmental campaigns and advocacy manager at Patagonia, Inc. "The Blue Business Council brings a strong new voice on this front, and we support California Coastkeeper Alliance’s efforts to engage this group of likeminded citizens and businesses in action and advocacy.”

California’s blue economy is a study of contrasts. California’s coast, bays and rivers power a $106 billion tourism industry and a $39 billion ocean economy. But half of California’s waterways are currently too polluted for swimming, fishing or drinking. The state’s coastal cities and counties spend $420 million annually cleaning up trash and marine debris, and poor water quality at Southern California beaches sickens one million swimmers every year.

California's economy relies heavily on our natural capital. Our continued economic success is dependent on the stewardship of these resources. Infographic

Credit: California Coastkeeper Alliance

Water is a renewable resource, but it is not inexhaustible,” said Sara Aminzadeh, executive director of California Coastkeeper Alliance. “California’s current drought underscores the need for decisive action and innovative policy reforms to protect our blue economy.”

Blue Business Council members recognized the importance of clean and plentiful water by taking the Clean Water Pledge. These companies are working to support policies and practices that address threats such as drought, trash and polluted runoff. California Coastkeeper Alliance and Blue Business Council members will celebrate Swimmable California Day on July 25, a day officially designated by the California Legislature in 2013 recognizing Californians’ rights to coastal areas, beaches, estuaries, rivers, streams and lakes that are clean and safe.

"New Belgium works to protect and restore the health of our watersheds and waterways because clean water is essential to great beer and our quality of life," said Jenn Vervier of New Belgium.

You Might Also Like

Burning River Fest Celebrates Vitality of Great Lakes Region

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Juvenile hatchery salmon flushed from a tanker truck in San Francisco Bay, California. Ben Moon

That salmon sitting in your neighborhood grocery store's fish counter won't look the same to you after watching Artifishal, a new film from Patagonia.

Read More Show Less
Natdanai Pankong / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Lauren Panoff, MPH, RD

Coconut meat is the white flesh inside a coconut.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Arx0nt / Moment / Getty Images

By Taylor Jones, RD

Oats are a highly nutritious grain with many health benefits.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

Get ready to toast bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. National Pollinator Week is June 17-23 and it's a perfect time to celebrate the birds, bugs and lizards that are so essential to the crops we grow, the flowers we smell, and the plants that produce the air we breathe.

Read More Show Less
Alexander Spatari / Moment / Getty Images

It seems like every day a new diet is declared the healthiest — paleo, ketogenic, Atkins, to name a few — while government agencies regularly release their own recommended dietary guidelines. But there may not be an ideal one-size-fits-all diet, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Logging shown as part of a thinning and restoration effort in the Deschutes National Forest in Oregon on Oct. 22, 2014. Oregon Department of Forestry / CC BY 2.0

The U.S Forest Service unveiled a new plan to skirt a major environmental law that requires extensive review for new logging, road building, and mining projects on its nearly 200 million acres of public land. The proposal set off alarm bells for environmental groups, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
Maskot / Getty Images

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to wonder which foods are healthiest.

Read More Show Less
Homes in Washington, DC's Brookland neighborhood were condemned to clear room for a highway in the 1960s. The community fought back. Brig Cabe / DC Public Library

By Teju Adisa-Farrar & Raul Garcia

In the summer of 1969 a banner hung over a set of condemned homes in what was then the predominantly black and brown Brookland neighborhood in Washington, DC. It read, "White man's roads through black men's homes."

Earlier in the year, the District attempted to condemn the houses to make space for a proposed freeway. The plans proposed a 10-lane freeway, a behemoth of a project that would divide the nation's capital end-to-end and sever iconic Black neighborhoods like Shaw and the U Street Corridor from the rest of the city.

Read More Show Less