Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Pig Forced to Bungee Jump in China Deemed Act of 'Torture'

Animals

Warning: The video above may be upsetting to viewers.

An amusement park in China came under fire on social media this weekend for forcing a pig off a 230 foot-high bungee tower.


The footage of the incident, which took place Saturday, went viral on Weibo, the leading Chinese social media platform, as The Independent reported. Users widely condemned the incident and accused the park of "torture."

"This is animal cruelty, no doubt about it," one commenter wrote. "I recommend we tie the organiser up to do the bungee jump instead."

The video showed the pig being carried up the bungee tower with its legs bound and tied to a poll, The New York Times reported. The paper described what happened next:

The animal could be heard squealing as it was dragged toward the tower's edge, attached to a bungee cable with a cape draped over its body. Pushed off the edge, it helplessly tumbled and bounced in midair as the cord sprang back. The animal's distressed screeches continued as it dangled, suspended in the air.

The incident comes as awareness of animal welfare issues is on the rise in China, which as yet has no laws on the books against animal cruelty, BBC News reported. But the public reaction shows there is potential for this to change, according to Jason Baker, senior vice-president of international campaigns with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

"Pigs experience pain and fear in the same ways that we do, and this disgusting PR stunt should be illegal," Baker told BBC News. "The Chinese public's angry response should be a wake-up call to China's policy-makers to implement animal protection laws immediately."

The Meixin Red Wine Town theme park in the southwestern municipality of Chongqing had organized the stunt to promote the opening of its bungee attraction, but the backlash prompted it to issue an apology.

"We sincerely accept netizens' criticism and advice and apologise to the public," it said in a statement reported by BBC News. "We will improve [our] marketing of the tourist site, to provide tourists with better services."

The park's owner also said the stunt was intended to help celebrate the Lunar New Year Jan. 25, after which the Year of the Pig will end and Year of the Rat will begin, The Independent reported. One commenter rejected this logic, however.

"You can't torture pigs just because the Year of the Pig has passed," they said.

Park officials said the pig was "all right" after the incident, but it was later taken to a slaughterhouse, a Chinese publication said, as The New York Times reported.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Charli Shield

At unsettling times like the coronavirus outbreak, it might feel like things are very much out of your control. Most routines have been thrown into disarray and the future, as far as the experts tell us, is far from certain.

Read More Show Less
Pie Ranch in San Mateo, California, is a highly diverse farm that has both organic and food justice certification. Katie Greaney

By Elizabeth Henderson

Farmworkers, farmers and their organizations around the country have been singing the same tune for years on the urgent need for immigration reform. That harmony turns to discord as soon as you get down to details on how to get it done, what to include and what compromises you are willing to make. Case in point: the Farm Workforce Modernization Act (H.R. 5038), which passed in the House of Representatives on Dec. 11, 2019, by a vote of 260-165. The Senate received the bill the next day and referred it to the Committee on the Judiciary, where it remains. Two hundred and fifty agriculture and labor groups signed on to the United Farm Workers' (UFW) call for support for H.R. 5038. UFW President Arturo Rodriguez rejoiced:

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A woman walks to her train in Grand Central Terminal as New York City attempts to slow down the spread of coronavirus through social distancing on March 27. John Lamparski / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A council representing more than 800,000 doctors across the U.S. signed a letter Friday imploring President Donald Trump to reverse his call for businesses to reopen by April 12, warning that the president's flouting of the guidance of public health experts could jeopardize the health of millions of Americans and throw hospitals into even more chaos as they fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less