Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Building a Solar City

Energy
Building a Solar City

Environment Ohio

Environmental groups and solar industry representatives applauded the latest draft of Cincinnati’s green plan on Tuesday morning. The draft plan, presented to city council’s Committee for Strategic Growth by the city Office of Environmental Quality, includes a renewable energy chapter dedicated to expanding the use of solar power in the city’s energy mix and the role that Cincinnati can play in promoting clean energy investments to residents, businesses and local institutions. The plan will pave the way for more solar energy investments, less pollution and good jobs in the city of Cincinnati, and final version could be ready for council approval as early as April.
 
Environmental groups, local clean energy businesses and dozens of members of the public attended the hearing to support the city’s vision and express excitement about the expanded attention to local solar power by the city. “The city’s latest green plan is a major step forward for solar power in Cincinnati,” said Christian Adams, Clean Energy Associate for Environment Ohio. “This plan will put Cincinnati on the map as a national leader for solar energy and our members who live and work in Hamilton County couldn’t be more excited. State leaders and other cities around Ohio should follow Cincinnati’s lead.”
 
During the hearing, numerous solar industry representatives testified to council on the job and economic development benefits of renewable energy to Cincinnati.
 
Siobhan Pritchard, regional sales manager for Dovetail Solar, spoke about her company’s decision to open a Cincinnati office due to the strong local demand for clean energy. “The city’s commitment to solar was an opportunity to hire staff in Cincinnati to meet local demand. Our solar contracts with the city help create professional and blue collar jobs–from system designers and sales executives to electricians and installers, helping to spur employment and economic revitalization,” said Pritchard. Dovetail has worked with city officials to perform numerous installations on municipal buildings including the College Hill Recreation Center and just completed a solar array for Burke Inc., a consulting firm headquartered in downtown Cincinnati.
 
When asked about the city’s recommendations, Steve Melink, owner and president of local green energy leader Melink Corp., commended the city’s efforts. “The City of Cincinnati’s list of recommendations on sustainability will improve our quality of life and make us more competitive in the Midwest and beyond,” said Melink.
 
The Office of Environmental Quality plans to hold a series of public meetings in coming months to get community feedback on the green plan recommendations. Adams expressed excitement about being a part of that process. “The level of community engagement by the city on the green plan recommendations is terrific. Cincinnati is choosing a clean energy future and will reap the benefits for years to come,”  said Adams.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES and ENERGY pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Climate change can evoke intense feelings, but a conversational approach can help. Reed Kaestner / Getty Images

Anger, anxiety, overwhelm … climate change can evoke intense feelings.


Read More Show Less
A rare North Atlantic right whale is seen off Cape Cod Bay on April 14, 2019 near Provincetown, Massachusetts. Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

An extremely rare North Atlantic right whale calf was found dead off the North Carolina coast on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Sprinklers irrigate a field of onions near a Castilian village in Spain. According to a new study, the average farm size in the EU has almost doubled since the 1960s. miguelangelortega / Moment / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A new report released Tuesday details the "shocking" state of global land equality, saying the problem is worse than thought, rising, and "cannot be ignored."

Read More Show Less