Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Building a Solar City

Energy

Environment Ohio

Environmental groups and solar industry representatives applauded the latest draft of Cincinnati’s green plan on Tuesday morning. The draft plan, presented to city council’s Committee for Strategic Growth by the city Office of Environmental Quality, includes a renewable energy chapter dedicated to expanding the use of solar power in the city’s energy mix and the role that Cincinnati can play in promoting clean energy investments to residents, businesses and local institutions. The plan will pave the way for more solar energy investments, less pollution and good jobs in the city of Cincinnati, and final version could be ready for council approval as early as April.
 
Environmental groups, local clean energy businesses and dozens of members of the public attended the hearing to support the city’s vision and express excitement about the expanded attention to local solar power by the city. “The city’s latest green plan is a major step forward for solar power in Cincinnati,” said Christian Adams, Clean Energy Associate for Environment Ohio. “This plan will put Cincinnati on the map as a national leader for solar energy and our members who live and work in Hamilton County couldn’t be more excited. State leaders and other cities around Ohio should follow Cincinnati’s lead.”
 
During the hearing, numerous solar industry representatives testified to council on the job and economic development benefits of renewable energy to Cincinnati.
 
Siobhan Pritchard, regional sales manager for Dovetail Solar, spoke about her company’s decision to open a Cincinnati office due to the strong local demand for clean energy. “The city’s commitment to solar was an opportunity to hire staff in Cincinnati to meet local demand. Our solar contracts with the city help create professional and blue collar jobs–from system designers and sales executives to electricians and installers, helping to spur employment and economic revitalization,” said Pritchard. Dovetail has worked with city officials to perform numerous installations on municipal buildings including the College Hill Recreation Center and just completed a solar array for Burke Inc., a consulting firm headquartered in downtown Cincinnati.
 
When asked about the city’s recommendations, Steve Melink, owner and president of local green energy leader Melink Corp., commended the city’s efforts. “The City of Cincinnati’s list of recommendations on sustainability will improve our quality of life and make us more competitive in the Midwest and beyond,” said Melink.
 
The Office of Environmental Quality plans to hold a series of public meetings in coming months to get community feedback on the green plan recommendations. Adams expressed excitement about being a part of that process. “The level of community engagement by the city on the green plan recommendations is terrific. Cincinnati is choosing a clean energy future and will reap the benefits for years to come,”  said Adams.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES and ENERGY pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less
Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less