Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Cheers! Budweiser Switches All U.S. Brewing to Renewables

Renewable Energy
Cheers! Budweiser Switches All U.S. Brewing to Renewables
The "King of Beers" is going green. Wikimedia Commons

Budweiser is switching all its U.S. beer brewing to renewable electricity and is launching a new label this spring that indicates that Bud is brewed with 100 percent renewables.

The move is line with parent company and world's largest beer manufacturer AB InBev's announcement last March to shift from fossil fuels by 2025 by obtaining all of its purchased electricity for brewing from renewables. The international beer giant owns 35 titles including Budweiser, Bud Light, Stella Artois, Natural Light, Busch, Michelob Ultra, Shock Top and Goose Island.


Forty-one million Budweisers are sold on average every day around the world. The switch to renewable electricity in Budweiser brewing operations will be the equivalent of taking 48,000 cars off the road every year, the company said.

The U.S. will be the first country where Budweisers will be brewed using 100 percent renewable electricity. The electricity will be sourced from Enel Green Power's 298-megawatt Thunder Ranch wind farm in Oklahoma.

Thunder Ranch wind farmCourtesy of Budweiser

"And that's just the beginning," Brian Perkins, global vice president at Budweiser, told Fast Company. "There's a solar field in Texas coming online in the next couple of years, as well as more similar infrastructure and deals happening in some of the bigger countries where we operate."

Budweiser has committed to brewing all of its beers around the world with 100 percent renewable electricity by 2025.

The company is encouraging other brands to use their new label on any product made using 100 percent renewable electricity to help build the environmental movement and to tackle climate change.

"We know that climate change is an important issue for consumers. However, they aren't sure how their everyday actions can make a difference. The renewable electricity symbol helps consumers make smarter everyday choices that can have a positive, meaningful impact," Perkins said.

According to Reuters, Budweiser believes that consumers will embrace the logo despite President Donald Trump's push of fossil fuels and well-known climate change denial.

"We've talked to beer drinkers in multiple countries—they roundly agree that climate change is a big issue," Perkins said.

Budweiser, which has recently fallen behind Miller Lite as the country's No. 3 favorite beer, behind No. 1 Bud Light and No. 2 Coors Light, is hoping to lift sales after a dip, Reuters reported.

This clean energy logo will be added to Budweiser's U.S. beers. Courtesy of Budweiser

Seattle-based Community Loaves uses home bakers to help those facing food insecurity during the pandemic. Sol de Zuasnabar Brebbia / Getty Images

By Lynn Freehill-Maye

The irony hit Katherine Kehrli, the associate dean of Seattle Culinary Academy, when one of the COVID-19 pandemic's successive waves of closures flattened restaurants: Many of her culinary students were themselves food insecure. She saw cooks, bakers, and chefs-in-training lose the often-multiple jobs that they needed simply to eat.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Storks in a nest near a construction crane. In the past 50 years, America's bird populations have fallen by a third. Maria Urban / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

What does a biodiversity crisis sound like? You may need to strain your ears to hear it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The Biden administration is temporarily using Obama-era calculations of the "social cost" of three greenhouse gas pollutants while calculating a more accurate estimate. Bloomberg Creative / Getty Images

The Biden administration announced it will use Obama-era calculations of the "social cost" of three greenhouse gas pollutants while an interagency working group calculates a more complete estimate, the White House announced Friday.

Read More Show Less
Posts about climate change will now automatically be labelled with an information banner that directs people to accurate climate science data at Facebook's Climate Science Information Center. Facebook

By Anne-Sophie Brändlin

Facebook has started tackling dangerous climate change myths and anti-environment propaganda that circulates among the platform's almost 3 billion monthly users.

Read More Show Less
Ningaloo Reef near Exmouth on April 2, 2012 in Western Australia. James D. Morgan / Getty Images News

By Dana M Bergstrom, Euan Ritchie, Lesley Hughes and Michael Depledge

In 1992, 1,700 scientists warned that human beings and the natural world were "on a collision course." Seventeen years later, scientists described planetary boundaries within which humans and other life could have a "safe space to operate." These are environmental thresholds, such as the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and changes in land use.

Read More Show Less