Quantcast

BP Pipeline Sprays Oil-Gas Mixture on 33 Acres of Alaskan Tundra

Energy

If you already thought BP was unfit to handle its own oil, an incident this week in Alaska won't change that opinion.

Alaska officials said a BP oil pipeline was somehow compromised and and resulted in the nonstop spraying of an oily mist into the wind for at least two hours. The mixture of gas, crude oil and water covered 33 acres of a frozen snow field near a BP oil well in Northern Alaska.

[blackoutgallery id="332948"] 

The Associated Press reported that no wildlife had been impacted. BP spokeswoman Dawn Patience wrote in an email to the AP that crews were still assessing repairs, and that it was too soon to estimate long-term impacts.

The spray took place at BP's Prudhoe oil field on Alaska’s North Slope. There are several oil fields nestled under the tundra in the area. According to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC), BP officials found the mist during a routine inspection.

The volume of the spill remains unknown and ADEC is continuing its investigation.

According to RT, cleanup efforts should be complete before a large amount of birds typically pass through the region in a few weeks. Prudhoe Bay is home to several migratory birds, caribou, a large porcupine herd and other animals.

In 2006, about 267,000 gallons of oil seeped through a quarter-inch-sized hole in a corroded BP pipeline. That went unnoticed for five days until a worker noticed the aroma. Three years later, 14,000 gallons of oil escaped from a pipeline into the tundra and wetlands of the area even though the company spent $500 million to upgrade 16 miles of pipeline that transported oil in the region to one of its facilities.

A recent report states that the U.S. oil industry is nowhere near prepared for large oil spills.

“The lack of infrastructure and oil spill response equipment in the U.S. Arctic is a significant liability in the event of a large oil spill,” the report reads. “Building U.S. capabilities to support oil spill response will require significant investment in physical infrastructure and human capabilities, from communications and personnel to transportation systems and traffic monitoring.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Federal Study Warns Oil Industry Nowhere Near Prepared for Spill in Arctic

Chicago Mayor Demands Answers From BP After Oil Spill

BP Admits Renewables Will Grow Faster Than Natural Gas in Next Two Decades

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More