Quantcast

BP Pipeline Sprays Oil-Gas Mixture on 33 Acres of Alaskan Tundra

Energy

If you already thought BP was unfit to handle its own oil, an incident this week in Alaska won't change that opinion.

Alaska officials said a BP oil pipeline was somehow compromised and and resulted in the nonstop spraying of an oily mist into the wind for at least two hours. The mixture of gas, crude oil and water covered 33 acres of a frozen snow field near a BP oil well in Northern Alaska.

[blackoutgallery id="332948"] 

The Associated Press reported that no wildlife had been impacted. BP spokeswoman Dawn Patience wrote in an email to the AP that crews were still assessing repairs, and that it was too soon to estimate long-term impacts.

The spray took place at BP's Prudhoe oil field on Alaska’s North Slope. There are several oil fields nestled under the tundra in the area. According to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC), BP officials found the mist during a routine inspection.

The volume of the spill remains unknown and ADEC is continuing its investigation.

According to RT, cleanup efforts should be complete before a large amount of birds typically pass through the region in a few weeks. Prudhoe Bay is home to several migratory birds, caribou, a large porcupine herd and other animals.

In 2006, about 267,000 gallons of oil seeped through a quarter-inch-sized hole in a corroded BP pipeline. That went unnoticed for five days until a worker noticed the aroma. Three years later, 14,000 gallons of oil escaped from a pipeline into the tundra and wetlands of the area even though the company spent $500 million to upgrade 16 miles of pipeline that transported oil in the region to one of its facilities.

A recent report states that the U.S. oil industry is nowhere near prepared for large oil spills.

“The lack of infrastructure and oil spill response equipment in the U.S. Arctic is a significant liability in the event of a large oil spill,” the report reads. “Building U.S. capabilities to support oil spill response will require significant investment in physical infrastructure and human capabilities, from communications and personnel to transportation systems and traffic monitoring.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Federal Study Warns Oil Industry Nowhere Near Prepared for Spill in Arctic

Chicago Mayor Demands Answers From BP After Oil Spill

BP Admits Renewables Will Grow Faster Than Natural Gas in Next Two Decades

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Farm waste being prepared for composting. USDA / Lance Cheung

By Tim Lydon

Can the United States make progress on its food-waste problems? Cities like San Francisco — and a growing list of actions by the federal government — show that it's possible.

Read More
Pexels

By C. Michael White

More than two-thirds of Americans take dietary supplements. The vast majority of consumers — 84 percent — are confident the products are safe and effective.

Read More
Sponsored
Pexels

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Coconut oil has become quite trendy in recent years.

Read More
The common giant tree frog from Madagascar is one of many species impacted by recent climate change. John J. Wiens / EurekAlert!

By Jessica Corbett

The human-caused climate crisis could cause the extinction of 30 percent of the world's plant and animal species by 2070, even accounting for species' abilities to disperse and shift their niches to tolerate hotter temperatures, according to a study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More
SolStock / Moment / Getty Images

By Tyler Wells Lynch

For years, Toni Genberg assumed a healthy garden was a healthy habitat. That's how she approached the landscaping around her home in northern Virginia. On trips to the local gardening center, she would privilege aesthetics, buying whatever looked pretty, "which was typically ornamental or invasive plants," she said. Then, in 2014, Genberg attended a talk by Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware. "I learned I was actually starving our wildlife," she said.

Read More