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Boom & Bust: The Future of Coal-Fired Power Plants

Energy

Utilities around the world risk wasting nearly one trillion dollars of investment in new coal-fired power plants as the global demand for coal declines, according to a new report.

There are approximately 1,500 new coal-fired plants in the planning or construction phases around the world, but existing coal plants are more often sitting idle, and electricity produced from coal continues to decrease globally. A separate report confirms the decline of coal in Asia due to a supply glut of the fuel, concerns about air pollution, and financial difficulties. The Paris climate agreement is also helping to drive a transition in the power sector, increasing investment in low-carbon and renewable energy.

For a deeper dive:

News: Bloomberg, The Guardian, Sydney Morning Herald

Commentary: Huffington Post, Nicole Ghio op-ed

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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