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Blog About Cities' Role in Sustainable Development to Win Trip to Abu Dhabi

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How can cities contribute to the advancement of sustainable development while addressing water, energy and waste?

It's a loaded question with an endless amount of answers that can spark healthy debate and potentially help metropolises prepare for the population boom many will experience over the next few decades.

It's also the question at the center of Masdar's second annual international Engage Blogging Contest. Masdar is a leading provider of renewable energy in Abu Dhabi, but the company opened the contest to anybody, anywhere.

Skyscrapers in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

“With 67 percent of the world’s population expected to reside in cities by 2050, we can anticipate a greater strain to be placed on cities as they become denser and require more water and energy,” said Omar Zaafrani, strategic communications manager at Masdar. “Through this blogging competition we aim to create a dialogue and debate the role of cities in achieving sustainable development. The competition will also offer a platform for the global community to voice their ideas and innovative solutions to tackling the urbanization challenge.” 

The best 500-to-600-word blog post with the “Cities and Sustainable Development" theme should be submitted by midnight EST, Jan. 3. Entries should either be published on personal blogs or emailed to Masdar. Click here for full instructions.

The winner will be awarded an all-expenses paid trip to attend, report and blog during the company's Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week 2014 event from Jan. 18 to 24. Masdar anticipates 30,000 attendees at the event that includes international summits on water, energy and more.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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