Quantcast

Bison Homecoming at Dunn Ranch Prairie

The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy announced Oct. 12 that a herd of 35 bison will be reintroduced onto Dunn Ranch Prairie in northwest Missouri this month.

The bison’s grazing patterns and other behaviors are key components of grassland communities. The herd will shape the prairie, creating a range of habitats suitable for a wide array of native plant and animal species. Ecological processes that were lost when bison disappeared from the landscape will be restored, increasing native species diversity and improving habitat for grassland birds.

The bison will be managed in a safe, respectful manner which emulates natural herd structures as closely as possible. The herd originated from Wind Cave National Park, one of only two founding herds in the U.S. that were not crossbred with cattle. To maintain genetic diversity, bison will be swapped with other conservancy herds on an annual basis.

With more than 25 years of experience in bison management, the conservancy is well-prepared for the herd’s arrival. The bison will be confined to the Dunn Ranch property using fencing that exceeds industry standards, and all bison will be routinely vaccinated and tested for disease.

Dunn Ranch contributes positively to neighboring communities. Visitors to Dunn Ranch patronize nearby hotels, restaurants and other businesses. Equipment and supplies are purchased locally, and the conservancy hires local contractors whenever possible. Additionally, although the organization is tax-exempt, the conservancy voluntarily pays taxes for the Dunn Ranch property annually.

The Nature Conservancy is a nonprofit, nongovernmental, charitable organization. The bison reintroduction is privately funded through family foundations and individual contributions.

The bison reintroduction is the culmination of over a decade of extensive prairie restoration at the 4,183-acre Dunn Ranch Prairie. Native seedings, tree removal, invasive species control and prescribed fires have produced dramatic results at the property. Dunn Ranch now boasts more than 300 native plant species as well as thriving populations of native birds, including bobolinks, Henslow’s sparrows, sedge wrens and northern harriers. Intensive efforts are ongoing to increase the greater prairie-chicken population.

After more than 160 years since bison last grazed Missouri grasslands, Dunn Ranch Prairie will once again be home to the iconic American Bison.

For more information, click here.

—————

The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Ryan Hagerty / USFWS

It's become a familiar story with the Trump administration: Scientists write a report that shows the administration's policies will cause environmental damage, then the administration buries the report and fires the scientists.

Read More Show Less
Valerie / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A coalition of some of the largest environmental groups in the country joined forces to file a lawsuit in federal court challenging the Trump administration's maneuver to weaken the Endangered Species Act.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
beyond foto / Getty Images

By Kimberly Holland

Children who eat a lot of gluten in their earliest years may have an increased risk of developing celiac disease and gluten intolerance, according to a new study published in JAMATrusted Source.

Read More Show Less
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Calling the global climate crisis both the greatest threat facing the U.S. and the greatest opportunity for transformative change, Sen. Bernie Sanders unveiled today a comprehensive Green New Deal proposal that would transition the U.S. economy to 100 percent renewable energy and create 20 million well-paying union jobs over a decade.

Read More Show Less
orientalizing / Flickr

The Parties to CITES agreed to list giraffes on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) today at the World Wildlife Conference or CoP18 in Geneva. Such protections will ensure that all giraffe parts trade were legally acquired and not sourced from the poached giraffes trade and will require countries to make non-detriment findings before allowing giraffe exports. The listing will also enable the collection of international trade data for giraffes that might justify greater protections at both CITES and other venues in the future.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

The WHO stressed that more research is needed on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion. luchschen / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The UN's health agency on Thursday said that microplastics contained in drinking water posed a "low" risk at their current levels.

However, the World Health Organization (WHO) — in its first report on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion — also stressed more research was needed to reassure consumers.

Read More Show Less

Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro is giving President Trump a run for his money in the alternative facts department.

Read More Show Less
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2019 State of the State address on Jan. 15. Governor Jay and First Lady Trudi Inslee / Flickr

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who made solving the climate crisis the center of his presidential campaign, is dropping out of the 2020 Democratic primary race.

Read More Show Less