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Bill Nye's 'Science Guy' Doc Targets Climate Change Deniers

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Bill Nye spent much of the 1990s teaching children about science. "Nowadays," he says in the first trailer for the upcoming documentary, Bill Nye: Science Guy, "I'm talking to adults."

It's true. These days, you mostly see Nye on cable news shows explaining scientific topics with hosts, marching with thousands in Washington, DC to remind our lawmakers about the importance of science, and hosting a Netflix show geared toward older audiences. In the trailer, Nye even shares wine with climate change denier Joe Bastardi.


As documentary guest star Neil deGrasse Tyson puts it, Nye has journeyed from "Bill Nye the Science Guy" to "the Science Statesman."

"When we learned that Bill Nye was doing something new—working outside of the classroom to champion science and space exploration and helping lead the fight against climate change, we knew we had to make this documentary," directors David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg said in a joint press release.

Nye, who is outspoken about global warming and its impact on humanity, declares in the trailer, "Climate change is happening, it's our fault and we've got to get to work on this."

The documentary also captures the launching of the solar-powered LightSail, a project of the Planetary Society—the world's largest non-profit space interest group where Nye is CEO.

Bill Nye: Science Guy is out next month. Here's a list of upcoming screenings:

October 3, Milwaukee Film Festival, Milwaukee, WI

October 5, Grand Cinema, Tacoma, WA

October 7, Dallas VideoFest, Dallas, TX

October 7, Pickford Film Center, Bellingham, WA

October 8 & 10, Milwaukee Film Festival, Milwaukee, WI

October 11, Hot Springs Documentary Festival, Hot Springs, AK

October 12-22, Heartland Film Festival, Indianapolis, IN

October 13, Pickford Film Center, Bellingham, WA

October 14, Globedocs, Boston, MA

October 21, Twin Cities Film Fest, Minneapolis, MN

Oct 27 - Nov 2, Landmark Sunshine, New York, NY

November 10-16, Landmark Nuart, Los Angeles, CA

November 17-23, Landmark Theatres, San Francisco, CA

November 17-23, Shattuck Cinemas, Berkeley, CA

November 17-23, West End Cinema, Washington, DC

November 17-23, SIFF-Uptown, Seattle, WA

November 17-23, Landmark Denver, Denver, CO

November 17-23, Hot Docs Cinema, Toronto, ON

December 8-14, Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME

December 15-21, Landmark Ritz Bourse, Philadelphia, PA

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