Quantcast
Popular
www.youtube.com

Bill Nye's 'Science Guy' Doc Targets Climate Change Deniers

Bill Nye spent much of the 1990s teaching children about science. "Nowadays," he says in the first trailer for the upcoming documentary, Bill Nye: Science Guy, "I'm talking to adults."

It's true. These days, you mostly see Nye on cable news shows explaining scientific topics with hosts, marching with thousands in Washington, DC to remind our lawmakers about the importance of science, and hosting a Netflix show geared toward older audiences. In the trailer, Nye even shares wine with climate change denier Joe Bastardi.


As documentary guest star Neil deGrasse Tyson puts it, Nye has journeyed from "Bill Nye the Science Guy" to "the Science Statesman."

"When we learned that Bill Nye was doing something new—working outside of the classroom to champion science and space exploration and helping lead the fight against climate change, we knew we had to make this documentary," directors David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg said in a joint press release.

Nye, who is outspoken about global warming and its impact on humanity, declares in the trailer, "Climate change is happening, it's our fault and we've got to get to work on this."

The documentary also captures the launching of the solar-powered LightSail, a project of the Planetary Society—the world's largest non-profit space interest group where Nye is CEO.

Bill Nye: Science Guy is out next month. Here's a list of upcoming screenings:

October 3, Milwaukee Film Festival, Milwaukee, WI

October 5, Grand Cinema, Tacoma, WA

October 7, Dallas VideoFest, Dallas, TX

October 7, Pickford Film Center, Bellingham, WA

October 8 & 10, Milwaukee Film Festival, Milwaukee, WI

October 11, Hot Springs Documentary Festival, Hot Springs, AK

October 12-22, Heartland Film Festival, Indianapolis, IN

October 13, Pickford Film Center, Bellingham, WA

October 14, Globedocs, Boston, MA

October 21, Twin Cities Film Fest, Minneapolis, MN

Oct 27 - Nov 2, Landmark Sunshine, New York, NY

November 10-16, Landmark Nuart, Los Angeles, CA

November 17-23, Landmark Theatres, San Francisco, CA

November 17-23, Shattuck Cinemas, Berkeley, CA

November 17-23, West End Cinema, Washington, DC

November 17-23, SIFF-Uptown, Seattle, WA

November 17-23, Landmark Denver, Denver, CO

November 17-23, Hot Docs Cinema, Toronto, ON

December 8-14, Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME

December 15-21, Landmark Ritz Bourse, Philadelphia, PA

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Business
zodebala / iStock

Investigators Find Slave Labor on Starbucks-Certified Brazil Coffee Plantation

By Daniela Penha and Roberto Cataldo, Translator

This story was produced via a co-publishing partnership between Mongabay and Repórter Brasil and can be read in Portuguese here.

At first sight, the Córrego das Almas farm in Piumhi, in rural Minas Gerais state, seems to be a model property. "No slave or forced labor is allowed," reads one of several signs that display international certifications—including one linked to the U.S. based company Starbucks corporation.

Keep reading... Show less
Politics
Oil and gas companies flare natural gas that cannot be processed or sold. Varodrig / Wikimedia Commons

Trump Lets Fracking Companies Release More Climate-Warming Methane

As expected, the U.S. Department of the Interior on Tuesday released a final rule that reverses Obama-era restrictions on methane emissions from oil and gas operations.

President Obama's 2016 methane waste rule, which never went into effect, required fossil fuel companies on tribal and public lands to reduce emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that's about 86 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. It called on drilling operators to capture leaking and vented methane and to update their leak-detection equipment.

Keep reading... Show less
Health
Smoke from the Carr Fire in northern California, July 2018. Eric Coulter, Bureau of Land Management / Public Domain

U.S. Air Pollution Is 'Completely Outrageous'

By Juanita Constible

How do you think the U.S. stacks up against other countries for protecting its citizens from the health threats of air pollution?

That's the question Christiana Figueres, one of the world's leading climate warriors, posed at last week's Global Climate and Health Forum, an official side event of the Global Climate Action Summit. The answer, said Ms. Figueres, is "completely outrageous."

Keep reading... Show less
Politics

Top EPA Watchdog Since 2010 Announces Departure

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) internal watchdog organization announced plans to leave for a job outside the federal government Tuesday, The Associated Press reported.

Arthur A. Elkins Jr., who has held the position of Inspector General since he was appointed by former president Barack Obama in 2010, will spend his last day at the agency Oct. 12, The Hill reported.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Popular
A man outside his flooded home in Lokoja in the Kogi state of Nigeria following heavy rains there. SODIQ ADELAKUN / AFP / Getty Images

100 Dead in Nigeria Following Severe Flooding

Nigeria declared a national disaster in four states Monday in response to deadly flooding that National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) spokesperson Sani Datti partly attributes to climate change, CNN reported.

Keep reading... Show less
Politics
L: Michael Coghlan / Flickr R: Coloured chest X-ray of a male patient showing evidence of a mesothelioma lung cancer, which is usually associated with exposure to asbestos. Zephyr / Science Photo Library / Getty Images

Report: 140 House Members Vote Against Chemical Safeguards Every Time

The Environmental Working Group Action Fund, the political arm of the Environmental Working Group (EWG), released a first-ever report that scores how each member of the U.S. House of Representatives voted on chemical policy and safety.

The scorecard shows that 140 House members voted against chemical safeguards every time, while 149 members consistently voted for chemical safety protections.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Food
grobery / CC BY SA 2.0 (Flickr)

What’s for Dinner? A Preview of the People, Process and Politics Updating Federal Dietary Guidelines

By Sarah Reinhardt

Months behind schedule, two federal departments have officially kicked off the process for writing the 2020-2025 iteration of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Updated and reissued every five years, these guidelines are the nation's most comprehensive and authoritative set of nutrition recommendations. And although the process is meant to be science-based and support population health—and has historically done so, with some notable exceptions—there are plenty of reasons to believe that the Trump administration is preparing to pitch a few curveballs.

Keep reading... Show less
Health
Vladimirovic / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The Many Hazards of Toxic Algae Outbreaks

By Sarah Graddy and Robert Coleman

This summer, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) is tracking outbreaks of potentially toxic algae across the U.S. We have been startled to find that these outbreaks are erupting everywhere: from the East Coast to the West Coast, from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!