Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Bill Nye Destroys Climate Change Conspiracy Theories

Popular

Today, we're focusing on the good people who take on the run-of-of-the-mill internet trolls.

First, our favorite science guy, Bill Nye, is back with a new video aimed at debunking climate change conspiracy theories. Vocativ combs through online conspiracy forums to see what "climate change truthers" are saying, then Nye takes down the wacky theories one by one. We won't get into every one as they've been repeatedly debunked before, but Nye takes on the truthers with his usual flair (and bow tie).

"It's not that the world didn't used to be warmer in the ancient dinosaur days," Nye said, "It's the speed at which the world is getting warmer ... that's so troublesome."

Nye also reminds viewers of the original #ExxonKnew conspiracy, saying, "The fossil fuel industry works very hard to maintain their status quo."

Two members of the Argonne National Laboratory, Seth Darling and Douglas Sisterson, follow Nye's lead, asking in a new post, "How can so many prominent individuals—and a notable fraction of the public—persist in promulgating such damaging viewpoints in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence?"

Their advice on winning over the truthers is to do much like what Nye does on a regular basis. "Scientists must step out of their laboratories and offices and interface with the public," Darling and Sisterson contend.

Hopefully, scientists and great communicators like Nye will continue to engage and get climate change further into the public conscious. He's already tried making bets with deniers, maybe now it's time for a round of Truther dares?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Several flower species, including the orchid, can recover quickly from severe injury, scientists have found. cunfek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Calling someone a delicate flower may not sting like it used to, according to new research. Scientists have found that many delicate flowers are actually remarkably hearty and able to bounce back from severe injury.

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 727 flies over approach lights with a trail of black-smoke from the engines on April 9, 2018. aviation-images.com / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

With global air travel at a near standstill, the airline industry is looking to rewrite the rules it agreed to tackle global emissions. The Guardian reports that the airline is billing it as a matter of survival, while environmental activists are accusing the industry of trying to dodge their obligations.

Read More Show Less
A National Guard member works on election day at a polling location on April 7, 2020 in Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Manis / Getty Images.

ByJulia Baumel

The outbreak of COVID-19 across the U.S. has touched every facet of our society, and our democracy has been no exception.

Read More Show Less