Quantcast

Bill Nye + Arnold Schwarzenegger Confront Climate Denial Head On

Climate

Bill Nye teamed up with Arnold Schwarzenegger to confront climate denial head on in an episode of National Geographic's Explorer, Bill Nye's Global Meltdown. The episode opens with Bill Nye telling his psychiatrist, Arnold Schwarzenegger, "I don't know, I'm just not myself lately. Everything seems so meaningless and empty."

Bill Nye's goes through the five stages of "climate change grief" as he confronts climate denial head on.

"Go on," says Schwarzenegger. "I know the planet is getting hotter and hotter," says Nye. "And I know we're going to have forest fires and droughts and floods like you've never seen. We're going to have storms and hurricanes and species are disappearing."

Nye, exasperated, concludes, "Sometimes I just want to close my eyes and pretend it's not happening." Schwarzenegger's prognosis: "It sounds to me like you are suffering from climate change grief." Schwarzenegger tells Nye he is dealing with the first stage of grief: denial.

So, Schwarzenegger instructs Nye to go "confront denial head on." And that's exactly what he does. Nye hits on many issues, including why it's probably not a good idea to buy a vacation in Southern Florida, Florida Gov. Rick Scott banning the term climate change and a Florida official hilariously refusing to use the term "climate change" as if it's a naughty word. Nye even sits down with climate-denying Florida State Rep. Walter Bryan "Mike" Hill to try to reason with him.

Ultimately, Nye goes through all five stages of "climate change grief"—denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. During his anger stage, he takes in Canada's Tar Sands by helicopter, calling the sight "depressive." And he meets with Melina Laboucan-Massimo, a Greenpeace activist and Alberta First Nation's member, who has made ending the tar sands development her life's mission.

In his bargaining stage, he looks at programs such as cap-and-trade, which are attempting to limit the amount of carbon pollution we emit into the atmosphere. In his depression stage, Nye meets with Guy McPherson, ecologist and author of Going Dark, who says the game is already over and he's bracing for the end of days. "I can't imagine there will be a human being on the planet in 2030," says McPherson.

And finally, as they each take tokes from a cigar, Schwarzenegger helps Nye "realize" that we're not doomed. Indeed, there is hope because science and technology offer so many solutions to our current problems. We just need to take action.

Check out the full episode here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

2 Billion People to Face Water Shortages as Snowpack Declines

3 Reasons Why Rand Paul Is Dead Wrong on Climate Change

Bill Nye, While Driving a Tesla, Shares 5 Ways to #BeUnstoppable

Exxon + 49 Other Big Polluters Set to Be Investigated for Causing Extreme Weather Events

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less