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Bike Washing Machine Gives Whole New Meaning to 'Spin Cycle'

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Bike Washing Machine Gives Whole New Meaning to 'Spin Cycle'

Want to get a good workout and get a mundane chore out of the way—all while not using electricity? Now you can, thanks to the Bike Washing Machine, designed by students at Dalian Nationalities University in China.

The Bike Washing Machine allows you to wash your clothes while you work out. Photo credit: Bike Washing Machine

Colin Levitch of BikeRadar praised the concept:

"The Tuvie Washing Machine gives the term ‘spin cycle’ a whole new meaning. Targeted at the time-starved athlete or those wishing to cut down on their utility bills, it’s essentially a spin bike, where the front wheel has been replaced with a laundry drum. As you pedal, the drum spins and gets your clothing clean.

We’re dreaming of spin class rooms filled with these, where patrons get a workout and a clean basket of clothing after their 45 minute session. Got a stubborn stain? We’re sure someone will create ‘stain intervals’ to see those gone."

According to the designers, any excess energy generated would power the display screen or be stored for later use.

Its small size would probably require multiple loads to complete your laundry, The Huffington Post pointed out. And Levitch noted there are a few key details missing: Do you need to run a water pipe to the bike or does it need to be manually filled? How do you drain the water?

Still, the concept offers a promising way to combine exercise and a carbon-free energy source to clean your dirty clothes.

There are other pedal-powered washing machine designs, including one designed specifically for the billions around the world without access to running water or electricity.

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