Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Beyond Sandy—How Resiliency can Lead America Toward a Sustainable Energy Future

Climate
Beyond Sandy—How Resiliency can Lead America Toward a Sustainable Energy Future

EcoWatch

By Paul E McGinniss

I was blown away this morning after seeing how Sandy wreaked havoc on the East Coast

With kudos to colleagues from "the cloud," here is a post-Sandy round up of what is being said on the heels of yet another freak weather event. Common themes included resiliency, Sandy's impact on the election and, of course, the elephant in the china closet—climate change. At EcoWatch, we're even more energized to get the dialog going on how to move America off fossil fuels and on renewable energy.

These voices offer a glimpse of what needs to be done to achieve a sustainable energy future:

Ten Low-Tech Responses to Storms and Emergencies via Transition Voice

If you don't already know about the Transition movement, you need to get up to speed. They are at the forefront of the back to basics—old fashioned, pull yourself up by the bootstraps—approach to dealing with anything Mother Nature can throw our way.

The Weather Reminds Us that It's Time to Get Serious About Resilient Design via TreeHugger

Lloyd Alter is one of my favorite writers on the Internet. He's one of the leading voices on combining going green and being environmentally friendly with resiliency.

Election in Sandy's Shadow - via Politico

Like the tons of CO2 in the atmosphere, there's tons of news today about how freak Sandy will affect the election. What's amazing about this discussion is that we're even talking about how our national election will be impacted by the weather. Thus, the much needed conversation about the impact of climate change on the world is brought up despite fearful politicians maneuvering to avoid the subject. Seems like the real storms and the political storms are meeting whether they want to or not.

Must See: Climate of Doubt - via SustainableBusiness

This PBS Frontline special documents how a handful of organizations have successfully prevented action on climate change in the U.S. Editor of SustainableBusiness, Rona Fried, says in her blog today: "While it may be great news to some that the U.S. could soon be the world's dominant producer of oil and gas, I'd much rather see the headline, 'U.S. Turns the Page Toward Renewables, Leaves Oil, Gas In the Ground.'"

Climate-Change Denying Senator James Inhofe Wins 2012 Rubber Dodo Award via EcoWatch

Read about Senator James Inhofe who thinks global warming is some kind of liberal conspiracy. Inhofe and fellow climate change deniers backed by the fossil fuel industry should be apologizing to Mayor Bloomberg today as they continue to allow corporations to put short-term profits before human health and the environment. Bloomberg and Governor Cuomo stressed today, the need to prepare for climate change. Continuing to deny climate change and global warming while encouraging America's addiction to fossil fuels is the real threat to our country.

Let's keep motivated and insist that our politicians embrace renewable energy once and for all. You can get started right now by signing EcoWatch's petition telling Congress to expedite renewable energy.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

——-

Paul E McGinniss is The New York Green Advocate. He is a green building consultant and real estate broker in New York. He is pretty much obsessed with all things environment and has lately become a resiliency addict.

 

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less
A rare bird not seen for 170 years has turned up in Borneo's South Kalimantan province in Indonesia. robas / Getty Images

In October 2020, two men living in Indonesia's South Kalimantan province on Borneo managed to catch a bird that they had never seen before. They photographed and released it, then sent the pictures to birdwatching organizations in the area for identification.

Read More Show Less
A resident of Austin, Texas scrapes snow into a bucket to melt it into water on Feb. 19, 2021. Winter storm Uri brought historic cold weather, leaving people in the area without water as pipes broke. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

President Joe Biden is being called on to back newly reintroduced legislation that seeks to remedy the nation's drinking water injustices with boosts to infrastructure and the creation of a water trust fund.

Read More Show Less