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You Can Fight Food Waste With These 4 Apps

Food
Candus Camera / Shutterstock

By Hannah Saulters

Spoiler alert: As much as 40 percent of the food produced in America ends up at the dump, off-gassing methane and contributing to climate change. And we consumers bear a great deal of the blame.

Become part of the solution with these free apps. Three of the four require a critical mass of users to create a sharing economy, so even if an app isn't yet functional in your community, go ahead, sign up and encourage other locals to do the same.


1. OLIO

The Gist

OLIO empowers neighbors to post and claim extra food. One of our Brooklyn-based editors recently scored free tomatoes posted by a gardener in her 'hood.

The Caveat(s)

This peer-to-peer network depends on a significant user base for peak performance—something that's happened only in major cities so far. There, stuff goes fast: 40 percent of listings are claimed within an hour.

The Founder's (or a Flack's) Two Cents

"Once people take the leap of faith, they're almost universally delighted by the amount of groceries people give away when they leave town or start diets," said Tessa Cook, co-founder.

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