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Stand-Up Paddler Breaks 3 World Records, Completes Solo Atlantic Crossing

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It's official! Chris Bertish has completed a journey of a lifetime—a world-first to cross the Atlantic Ocean unaided on a paddleboard.


Chris Bertish, a 42-year-old professional adventurer, has already traveled 83 days in his attempt to become the first person to stand-up paddleboard across the Atlantic Ocean from mainland Morocco to Antigua.

Just 16 days after he began his adventure, Bertish reached his monumental 34°W mark, passing the line of the easternmost point of mainland South America, giving him the world record for a solo, unsupported and unassisted open ocean expedition. And, if that wasn't enough, Bertish set a new world record for his 24-hour solo, unsupported and unassisted, open ocean distance of 71.96 miles on Feb. 15. This is the third World Record that he has achieved so far on his epic ocean adventure.

As EcoWatch reported in December, Bertish is on a solo paddle, paddling an estimated 4,500 miles of open ocean on his 20-foot craft in four months. He plans to arrive at the Leeward Island of Antigua in the Caribbean in early March.

"The main goal of this project is to push the limits of what's possible for the sport and for what the human spirit can endure, while inspiring others to believe in themselves and what's truly possible," Bertish said. "We are changing the lives of millions by paddling smiles across the faces of less fortunate children in Africa and South Africa, with the money we raise for this incredible project."

You can track Bertish's journey here:

The SUP Crossing

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