Quantcast

Bernie Sanders Would Beat Donald Trump and Other GOP Frontrunners, New Poll Says

Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) would win the 2016 U.S. presidential election against all top Republican candidates, with scores that make him more electable in the general than even former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, his main rival for the Democratic nomination, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

In a match-up against the leading Republican candidates, Sanders leads Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas) by 10 points, Donald Trump by eight points and Ben Carson by six points—while Clinton only leads Cruz by five points and Trump by six.

A majority of the 1,453 registered voters surveyed—59 percent—said they saw Sanders as honest and trustworthy. Photo credit: Gage Skidmore / Flickr

A majority of the 1,453 registered voters surveyed—59 percent—said they saw Sanders as honest and trustworthy, which places him above all other presidential candidates in the same category. Clinton received 60 percent unfavorable ratings on honesty.

Nonetheless, respondents also largely believe that Clinton would win against a Republican nominee in the general election. The poll shows Donald Trump as the party's current frontrunner, claiming 27 percent of Republican voters.

"It doesn't seem to matter what he says or who he offends, whether the facts are contested or the 'political correctness' is challenged, Donald Trump seems to be wearing Kevlar," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, adding that Clinton and Sanders "have to be hoping Trump is the GOP's guy."

The poll follows other recent surveys that indicate a majority of voters favor Sanders over any GOP candidate. While he's still behind Clinton among Democratic voters, Sanders' position currently mirrors that of President Barack Obama at the same stage in the 2008 election, as journalist H.A. Goodman pointed out on Monday.

The university surveyed 1,453 registered voters nationwide with an error margin of +/- 2.6 percentage points.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bernie Sanders: GOP Candidates Care More About Koch Money Than ‘Preserving the Planet for Our Children’

Michael Mann: This GOP Presidential Candidate ‘Understands Less About Science Than the Average Kindergartner’

Prince Harry’s Moving Photos From Africa Trip Show Brutal Reality of Poaching

Exxon Targets Journalists Who Exposed Massive Climate Cover Up

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Katherine Marengo, LDN, RD

In recent years, functional foods have gained popularity within health and wellness circles.

Read More
Despite fierce opposition from local homeowners, a section of the SUNOCO Mariner II East Pipeline cuts through a residential neighborhood of Exton, PA. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

To celebrate the 50th birthday of one of America's most important environmental laws, President Trump has decided to make a mockery out of it.

Read More
Sponsored
With well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage. An economist from the University of Michigan Energy Institute says that is likely to change. Maskot / Getty Images

In 2018, there were about 5 million electric cars on the road globally. It sounds like a large number, but with well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage.

Read More
Nestlé is accelerating its efforts to bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and to address the global challenge of plastic packaging waste. Nestlé / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nestlé, the world's largest food company, said it will invest up to $2 billion to address the plastic waste crisis that it is largely responsible for.

Read More
Determining the effects of media on people's lives requires knowledge of what people are actually seeing and doing on those screens. Vertigo3d / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Byron Reeves, Nilam Ram and Thomas N. Robinson

There's a lot of talk about digital media. Increasing screen time has created worries about media's impacts on democracy, addiction, depression, relationships, learning, health, privacy and much more. The effects are frequently assumed to be huge, even apocalyptic.

Read More