Quantcast

Bernie Sanders Makes History With 2 Million Individual Campaign Contributions

Politics

The Bernie Sanders campaign announced Sunday that it "reached a major milestone in grassroots financial support" during the third Democratic presidential debate.

A statement posted on its website says the campaign has now received more than 2.3 million contributions. That means Sanders now holds the record for highest number of contributions for a White House bid, breaking the record held by President Barack Obama in 2011.

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaking during the Democratic Presidential debate from St. Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Saturday, Dec. 19. Photo credit: Disneyabc / Flickr

The statement adds that "grassroots supporters flooded" the campaign site during the debate, with the average contribution amount being below $25.

Last week, when his campaign surpassed the 2 million contribution mark, the Vermont senator praised the "people power" supporting his campaign, saying, "You can’t level the playing field with Wall Street banks and billionaires by taking their money."

The campaign also claimed victory for "winning social media" during the debate against his rivals, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former Gov. Martin O’Malley of Maryland.

Sanders' performance also got a nod from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, who tweeted during the debate:

Some observers pointed to the absence of climate change from the debate. 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben tweeted:

While climate change wasn't mentioned, as one Huffington Post reporter points out, the debate moderators did make time to ask the candidates what role their spouses would play in the White House.

In addition to facing criticism for placing "its thumb on the scales in support of Hillary Clinton's campaign," the Democratic National Committee (DNC) has faced criticism over the number and timing of the Democratic primary—an issue stressed after this latest square-off by The Nation's John Nichols:

"The DNC needs to schedule more debates on more nights when more Americans are watching."

"That’s good for Democrats. And that’s good for democracy—especially in what is shaping up as an entirely unpredictable and frequently volatile political season that ought not be dominated by one party. As Lis Smith says, 'It’s clear we need to open up the process, have more debates and engage more voters in this process.'"

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Hillary Clinton Opposes Offshore Drilling, Vows to Look Into Fossil Fuel Industry Donations

‘Bernie Blackout’: 81 Media Minutes on Trump = 1 Minute on Sanders

Republican Leaders Call for Climate Action

Congressional Republicans Deliver Early Christmas Gift to Big Oil, Exxon and Koch Brothers

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp Fire on Nov. 15, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Respecting scientists has never been a priority for the Trump Administration. Now, a new investigation from The Guardian revealed that Department of the Interior political appointees sought to play up carbon emissions from California's wildfires while hiding emissions from fossil fuels as a way to encourage more logging in the national forests controlled by the Interior department.

Read More
Slowing deforestation, planting more trees, and cutting emissions of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases like methane could cut another 0.5 degrees C or more off global warming by 2100. South_agency / E+ / Getty Images

By Dana Nuccitelli

Killer hurricanes, devastating wildfires, melting glaciers, and sunny-day flooding in more and more coastal areas around the world have birthed a fatalistic view cleverly dubbed by Mary Annaïse Heglar of the Natural Resources Defense Council as "de-nihilism." One manifestation: An increasing number of people appear to have grown doubtful about the possibility of staving-off climate disaster. However, a new interactive tool from a climate think tank and MIT Sloan shows that humanity could still meet the goals of the Paris agreement and limit global warming.

Read More
Sponsored
A baby burrowing owl perched outside its burrow on Marco Island, Florida. LagunaticPhoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Burrowing owls, which make their homes in small holes in the ground, are having a rough time in Florida. That's why Marco Island on the Gulf Coast passed a resolution to pay residents $250 to start an owl burrow in their front yard, as the Marco Eagle reported.

Read More
Amazon and other tech employees participate in the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Amazon Employees for Climate Justice continue to protest today. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Hundreds of Amazon workers publicly criticized the company's climate policies Sunday, showing open defiance of the company following its threats earlier this month to fire workers who speak out on climate change.

Read More
Locusts swarm from ground vegetation as people approach at Lerata village, near Archers Post in Samburu county, approximately 186 miles north of Nairobi, Kenya on Jan. 22. "Ravenous swarms" of desert locusts in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia threaten to ravage the entire East Africa subregion, the UN warned on Jan. 20. TONY KARUMBA / AFP / Getty Images

East Africa is facing its worst locust infestation in decades, and the climate crisis is partly to blame.

Read More