Quantcast
Politics

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton Make History in Virtual Tie in Iowa

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders made history in Iowa Monday night, ending 2016’s opening presidential nominating contest in an unprecedented virtual tie that shows Democrats may be experiencing an identity crisis as deep as Republicans.

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders made history in Iowa on Monday night, ending 2016’s opening presidential nominating contest in an unprecedented virtual tie.

After midnight local time, Clinton appeared to be maintaining the barest of edges to win more delegates than Sanders to the next stage in Iowa’s 2016 Democratic presidential nominating process—county conventions. It was the slimmest of margins—four more delegates out of nearly 1,400 awarded—an all-but tie that defied expectations as Sanders ran a people-powered race calling for a political and economic revolution, while Clinton called for more a gradual political evolution building on the Obama years.

As the evening’s vote counting crawled to its nail-biting peak, Clinton’s campaign had at one point 628 delegates to the next stage in the party’s process while Sanders had 625 delegates, a difference of 49.8 percent to 49.6 percent. Martin O’Malley, who suspended his campaign on Monday after the caucuses, had 7 delegates or .6 percent of those awarded. More than two hours later, with 99 percent of precincts reporting, Clinton had 696 delegates to Sanders’ 692 delegates, 49.9 percent to 49.6 percent.

Mainstream pundits—like those on CNN—called it “a bad night” for the establishment—given Ted Cruz’s victory on the Republican side and said Clinton won a political victory while Sanders won a moral victory. That gave Clinton the headlines she wanted, but it’s not accurate; it’s incomplete. Even CNN said several dozen of the 1,800 precincts had yet to report, including some university locations strongly favoring Sanders. The Associated Press tweeted that it would not declare a winner in the race:

When the final count is known and delegates awarded, it may be a night that will be compared to Sanders’ first victory in 1981, when he was elected mayor of Burlington, Vermont, by 10 votes. Iowa’s Democratic Party doesn’t release the raw vote numbers, just the delegates awarded. The rural areas are given more delegates than cities, meaning Sanders may have won more raw votes even if he lost this stage’s delegate count by a hair.

Both candidates declared victory in their own ways, with the more seasoned Clinton giving an earlier and shorter speech where she signaled that the campaign was about to enter a more fervent period over the soul of the Democratic Party.

“It is rare that we have the opportunity we do now, to have now a real contest of ideas; to really think hard about what the Democratic Party stands for and what we want the future of our country to look like,” she said. “I am a progressive that gets things done for people. I am honored to stand in the long line of American reformers who make up our minds that the status quo is not good enough, that standing still is not an option and it brings people together to find ways forward that will improve the lives of Americans.”

Read page 1

Clinton supporters were Democrats who said they first and foremost were drawn to her experience, according to national media entrance polls. Her supporters cited “the right experience,” confidence about winning in November and said they were centrists—caring more about healthcare and jobs than inequality, the polls said. More women than men supported her, the pollsters found, as did people older than 45 supported her.

Sanders' supporters, the same polls found, had opposing views and were often younger.

“When it is all said and done, we have to be united against a Republican vision,” Clinton said, addressing partisan opponents—not Sanders. “I followed their campaign very closely. I understand what they are appealing to and I intend to stand against it. I will not let their divisiveness, their efforts to rip away the progress that we’ve made be successful because we can’t afford that.”

Sanders called his stunning come-from-behind showing a major victory and said that it was the start of a political revolution. His closing speeches in Iowa emphasized that his campaign was part of a historic progressive legacy fighting for economic and social justice reforms and cannot be dismissed—as many in the Washington media have tried to do in recent days. His campaign planned to ask its more than 3.5 million donors for more small contributions to keep going. He undoubtedly will raise the funds it needs.

“Nine months months, ago we came to this beautiful state. We had no political organization. We had no money. We had no name recognition. And we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the United States of America,” he began his speech. “And tonight, while the results are still not known, it looks like we are in a virtual tie … We will have about half of the Iowa delegates.”

Sanders praised Clinton and O’Malley and then recited some of the strongest lines from his stump speeches, saying his movement for fundamental change would propel him to victory against Clinton and against Republicans in November.

“The reason we have done so well in Iowa. The reason why I think we are going to do so well in New Hampshire and in the other states that follow—the reason is the American people are saying 'no' to a rigged economy,” he said. “They no longer want to see an economy in which the average American works longer hours for lower wages while almost all new income and wealth is going to the top 1 percent … What the American people understand is this country was based on fairness.”

But Sanders also had harsh words for the media, saying it was time for them to start taking his call for an economy and policies that worked for average Americans seriously. “For all of the my critics out there, The Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, corporate America and whereever you may be, let me tell you straight up, Let me tell you that health care is a right not a privilege,” he said, then explaining the appeal of his Medicare for all national health care plan.

“Let me conclude by saying what no other candidate will tell you,” he said. “No president can do what needs to be done alone. And that is why what Iowa has begun tonight is a political revolution … when young people and working people and seniors begin to stand up and say loudly and clearly, 'Enough is enough,' that our government belongs to all of us, when that happens we will transform this country.”

The race now moves to New Hampshire, next to Sanders’ home state and where he has been leading in polls by double-digits for weeks. It is very unlikely that Clinton will win there next week—like she did against Obama in 2008—signaling that the Democratic race is heading into a weeks-long fight for not just for the presidential nomination, but for its identity and future.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE 

Gov. Kasich Admits Renewables Are the Future, So Why Did He Freeze Ohio’s Clean Energy Mandate

How Iowa Caucus Could Place Urgency of Climate Action to Forefront of National Debate

Exclusive Video: How Obama Won the Iowa Caucus and What Hillary and Bernie Can Learn From Him

Sanders vs. Clinton: Hard Hitting Final Pitches to Iowa Voters

Show Comments ()
Sponsored
Oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. Julie Dermansky

Nearly 400,000 Gallons of Oil Spews Into Gulf of Mexico, Could Be Largest Spill Since Deepwater Horizon

Last week, a pipe owned by offshore oil and gas operator LLOG Exploration Company, LLC spilled up to 393,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, reminding many observers of the Deepwater Horizon explosion seven years ago that spewed approximately 210 million gallons of crude into familiar territory.

Now, a report from Bloomberg suggests that the LLOG spill could be the largest in the U.S. since the 2010 BP blowout, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE).

Keep reading... Show less

Strange Days: Ex-Hurricane Ophelia Batters Ireland Under Orange Skies

By Dr. Jeff Masters and Bob Henson

Ex-Hurricane Ophelia hit Ireland hard with full hurricane-like fury on Monday, bringing powerful winds that caused widespread damage and power outages. At least two deaths have been reported from trees falling on cars, and The Irish Times said at least 360,000 ESB Networks customers lost power in Ireland because of the storm.

Keep reading... Show less
Runoff from a farm field in Iowa during a rain storm. Lynn Betts / U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service

Drinking Water for Millions in Rural America Contaminated With Suspected Carcinogen

Drinking water supplies for millions of Americans in farm country are contaminated with a suspected cancer-causing chemical from fertilizer, according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group.

The contaminant is nitrate, which gets into drinking water sources when chemical fertilizer or manure runs off poorly protected farm fields. Nitrate contaminates drinking water for more than 15 million people in 49 states, but the highest levels are found in small towns surrounded by row-crop agriculture. Major farm states where the most people are at risk include California, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin and Kansas.

Keep reading... Show less
www.youtube.com

Trump's Approval Rating on Hurricane Response Sinks 20 Points After Puerto Rico

President Trump's approval rating for overseeing the federal government's response to hurricanes fell by 20 points after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, a CNN poll conducted by SSRS revealed.

Trump's approval rating for responding to hurricanes Harvey and Irma stood at 64 percent in mid-September. Just a month later, only 44 percent approve.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Photo taken by Hélio Madeiras, a firefighter in Portugal. Facebook

Wildfires Rage Through Portugal and Spain, Kill at Least 39

Wildfires have killed at least 39 people in Spain and Portugal since Sunday.

Hundreds of fires in both countries are being fanned by winds from Hurricane Ophelia in the north, currently barreling towards Ireland, and encouraged by extremely dry terrain from a scorching hot summer in the region.

Keep reading... Show less
Desperate for water, Puerto Ricans are resorting to any available sources, such as this stream in Cayey. Angel Valentin / NPR

Desperate Puerto Ricans Are Drinking Water From Hazardous Waste Sites

The ranking Democrat on the House Homeland Security Committee called for an investigation into the availability of potable water in Puerto Rico following reports Friday that residents are scrounging for water from hazardous waste sites.

After the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) confirmed residents were trying to access water from three Superfund sites, and following a CNN story Friday featuring Puerto Ricans taking water from a fourth site, Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS) wrote a letter to acting DHS Secretary Elaine Duke asking if she knew about the situation and calling the reports "beyond disturbing."

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Brant at Izembek Lagoon. Kristine Sowl / USFWS

Groups Slam Zinke's 'Backroom Deals' to Build Road Through Alaskan Wildlife Refuge

Ryan Zinke's Interior Department is working behind the scenes to build a controversial and long-contested road through the heart of Alaska's Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, documents show.

The refuge was established more than 30 years ago to conserve wetlands and habitats for migrating birds, brown bears and salmon and other wildlife. 300,000 of its 315,000 acres has been designated as Wilderness in 1980 under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

Keep reading... Show less
FAO / Giulio Piscitelli

On World Food Day, Pope Francis Says Link Between Climate Change and Hunger Is Undeniable

By Andrew McMaster

Speaking at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on World Food Day, Pope Francis addressed the need for governments around the world to acknowledge that climate change and migration were leading to increases in world hunger.

Francis received a standing ovation after a stirring speech in which he said all three issues were interrelated and require immediate attention.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

Get EcoWatch in your inbox