Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Belize Ends Oil Operations in Its Ocean Waters

Popular
Belize Ends Oil Operations in Its Ocean Waters
Antonio Busiello / WWF-US

Belize, home of the largest barrier reef in the western hemisphere, has permanently suspended oil operations in its ocean waters. The legislation marks the first time that a developing country has taken such a major step to protect its oceans—and all the life within—from oil exploration and extraction.

The new suspension of oil activity marks an enormous win for the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System World Heritage site, the wildlife that live there, and the hundreds of thousands of Belizeans who rely on the reef for survival.


"Today is a great day for Belize," said Nadia Bood, Mesoamerican reef scientist at World Wildlife Fund (WWF). "Not only has its government listened to calls to protect the Belize Barrier Reef, which only last year was under threat from seismic oil exploration, it has stepped up to become a world leader in ocean protection by ending all oil activity in its waters."

Ecosystems in the reef have already been damaged by coastal construction, and potential oil drilling posed a major threat. Harmful industrial activities would impact Belize's economy, natural resources and the 1,400 species found in the reef system.

More than 450,000 people from around the world joined WWF's campaign to end oil exploration and other harmful activities in the reef.

Antonio Busiello / WWF-US

A National Treasure

The Belize barrier reef teems with life that will benefit from the new protections. The endangered hawksbill turtle, manatees and six threatened species of shark live in these waters. Vibrant corals abound, and aquatic animals shelter their young in mangrove forests along the coast.

And people will benefit from a healthy reef, too. Belize's economy is built on tourism, so the health of the reef directly impacts the country's future. Tourism alone is estimated to bring in between $182 million to $237 million per year, with reef-related tourism and fisheries supporting about 190,000 people.

"By acting to remove a major threat to the reef, Belize is safeguarding its future prosperity," Bood said. We hope today's announcement will encourage other countries to follow suit and take urgent actions needed to protect our planet's oceans."

A rare rusty-spotted cat is spotted in the wild in 2015. David V. Raju / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 4.0

Misunderstanding the needs of how to protect three rare cat species in Southeast Asia may be a driving factor in their extinction, according to a recent study.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Cyclone Gati on Sunday had sustained winds of 115 miles per hour. NASA - EOSDIS Worldview

Cyclone Gati made landfall in Somalia Sunday as the equivalent of a Category 2 hurricane, the first time that a hurricane-strength storm has made landfall in the East African country, NPR reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

An aerial view shows pumpjacks in the South Belridge Oil Field on April 24, 2020 near McKittrick, California. David McNew / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A new campaign unveiled this weekend by the nonprofit organization Fossil Free Media aims to expand on the goals of the fossil fuel divestment movement, cutting into oil and gas companies' profit margins through their public relations and ad campaigns.

Read More Show Less
martin-dm / E+ / Getty Images

By Jason Farley

COVID-19 has disrupted our daily lives, and it is poised to completely disrupt the holiday season. As people make holiday plans and think about ways to reduce the risks to their loved ones, a strategy is essential.

Read More Show Less
Key West voters have passed three ballot initiatives to limit the impact of visiting cruise ships on island life and fragile marine habitats. felixmizioznikov / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Despite being a well-known port of call on the Caribbean cruise circuit, the City of Key West voted to ban large cruise ships from visiting and to restrict foot traffic from vessels. Supporters and opponents disagreed about the safety, environmental and economic merits of the proposals.

Read More Show Less