Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Beauty Is Nature’s Tool for Survival (Prepare to Be Wowed)

Beauty Is Nature’s Tool for Survival (Prepare to Be Wowed)

Imagine that you had a film camera running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for more than 32 years.

Welcome to the world of award-winning producer, director and cinematographer Louie Schwartzberg.

The filmmaker, moved by the wonder and joy of watching plants grow and clouds move, took to time-lapse, high-speed and macro cinematography, so that others could similarly be spiritually moved and transformed by the beauty of the natural world around them. He makes the invisible visible.

Still from a Schwartzberg TED talk.

“I love to explore things that the human eye can’t see,” says Schwartzberg. And through his camera work, he offers audiences a stunning, intimate, high-definition glimpse of nature.

Schwartzberg talks with the Green Divas about his three-decade-long career, including his recent film Wings of Life, a feature-length documentary for Disneynature, narrated by Meryl Streep.

Recognized for their importance this week—National Pollinator Week—pollinators are crucial for the food we eat, to our survival. Wings of Life pays homage to (and offers a glimpse into the hidden world of) bees, bats, hummingbirds and butterflies, including the precarious relationship they have with flowers. “Beauty is nature’s tool for survival,” reflects Schwartzberg.

You can see some beautiful, mind blowing images in Schwartzberg’s TED talks.

Here he explores the intersection between technology, art and science, curiosity and wonder. And through time-lapse, high-speed and macro filming, the anatomy of Earth is brought to life.

Schwartzberg describes his greatest satisfaction as creating works that have a positive effect on the future of Earth: “I hope my films inspire and open people’s hearts … If I can move enough people on an emotional level, I hope we can achieve the shift in consciousness we need to sustain and celebrate life.”

 

Kevin Russ / Moment / Getty Images

By Kang-Chun Cheng

Modoc County lies in the far northeast corner of California, and most of its 10,000 residents rely on cattle herding, logging, or government jobs for employment. Rodeos and 4-H programs fill most families' calendars; massive belt buckles, blue jeans, and cowboy hats are common attire. Modoc's niche brand of American individualism stems from a free-spirited cowboy culture that imbues the local ranching conflict with wild horses.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Christian Aslund / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Anne-Sophie Brändlin

COVID-19 and climate change have been two of the most pressing issues in 2020.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Artist's impression of an Othalo community, imagined by architect Julien De Smedt. Othalo

By Victoria Masterson

Using one of the world's problems to solve another is the philosophy behind a Norwegian start-up's mission to develop affordable housing from 100% recycled plastic.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brett Wilkins

Despite acknowledging that the move would lead to an increase in the 500 million to one billion birds that die each year in the United States due to human activity, the Trump administration on Friday published a proposed industry-friendly relaxation of a century-old treaty that protects more than 1,000 avian species.

Read More Show Less
U.S. returns create about 15 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. manonallard / Getty Images

Many people shop online for everything from clothes to appliances. If they do not like the product, they simply return it. But there's an environmental cost to returns.

Read More Show Less