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Beauty Is Nature’s Tool for Survival (Prepare to Be Wowed)

Imagine that you had a film camera running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for more than 32 years.

Welcome to the world of award-winning producer, director and cinematographer Louie Schwartzberg.

The filmmaker, moved by the wonder and joy of watching plants grow and clouds move, took to time-lapse, high-speed and macro cinematography, so that others could similarly be spiritually moved and transformed by the beauty of the natural world around them. He makes the invisible visible.

Still from a Schwartzberg TED talk.

“I love to explore things that the human eye can’t see,” says Schwartzberg. And through his camera work, he offers audiences a stunning, intimate, high-definition glimpse of nature.

Schwartzberg talks with the Green Divas about his three-decade-long career, including his recent film Wings of Life, a feature-length documentary for Disneynature, narrated by Meryl Streep.

Recognized for their importance this week—National Pollinator Week—pollinators are crucial for the food we eat, to our survival. Wings of Life pays homage to (and offers a glimpse into the hidden world of) bees, bats, hummingbirds and butterflies, including the precarious relationship they have with flowers. “Beauty is nature’s tool for survival,” reflects Schwartzberg.

You can see some beautiful, mind blowing images in Schwartzberg’s TED talks.

Here he explores the intersection between technology, art and science, curiosity and wonder. And through time-lapse, high-speed and macro filming, the anatomy of Earth is brought to life.

Schwartzberg describes his greatest satisfaction as creating works that have a positive effect on the future of Earth: “I hope my films inspire and open people’s hearts … If I can move enough people on an emotional level, I hope we can achieve the shift in consciousness we need to sustain and celebrate life.”

 

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