Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Be an H20 Hero—Pick up a Watershed Community Calendar

Be an H20 Hero—Pick up a Watershed Community Calendar

Huron River Watershed Council

The 2012 calendar features stunning watershed photography from local photographers Marc Akemann, Keith Matz and Ted Nelson and 12 months of tips for protecting the Huron River.

This year, Huron River Watershed Council and the community sponsors are asking calendar recipients to participate in an online survey. The survey will help us evaluate our past education efforts and will set the direction for our future outreach programming throughout the watershed. We hope to learn what watershed residents know about preventing water pollution.

Take the survey now

Get your calendar for free from HRWC.

Pick one up M-F, 9am-5pm at the NEW Center, 1100 N. Main Street, Ann Arbor.

Or go to the customer service desk at the following community locations:

Barton Hills Village
Brighton Township
City of Ann Arbor*
City of Brighton*
City of Ypsilanti
Livingston County Drain Commission
Livingston County Road Commission
Marion Township
Pittsfield Township
Village of Dexter
Village of Pinckney
Washtenaw County Road Commission
Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office
Ypsilanti Township

*Ann Arbor and Brighton have mailed calendars directly to residents.

HRWC can also mail your calendar to you for a $5 charge to cover postage and handling. Submit your request by mail with a check payable to HRWC. Attn: Pam Labadie, HRWC, 1100 N. Main Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104.

Help HRWC and your community protect the Huron River. Your participation in the survey is very important to us.

Whether or not you’ve seen our ads, tip cards or calendar, we need as many people as possible to take the survey.

For questions, contact Pam at [email protected], (734) 769-5123 x 602.

For more information, click here.

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less